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Latest schistosomiasis Stories

2012-01-05 16:26:53

A potential target for schistosomiasis vaccine In the complicated life cycle of ancient flatworms that cause schistosomiasis, Case Western Reserve University researchers have identified a gene activator crucial to development of the parasites within humans — a potential target for a vaccine. A description of the activator, which turns on rapid growth, is in the online journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Schistosomiasis, which causes organ damage and failure, afflicts more...

2011-12-10 02:19:08

Global HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment efforts are missing a major opportunity to significantly improve health conditions in poor countries by simply adding low-cost care for the many other chronic and disabling diseases routinely afflicting and often killing these same patients, according to a panel of disease experts who spoke at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). "People want better health; they do not understand why we silo diseases,"...

2011-09-28 10:16:44

Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have for the first time identified a 'programmed cell death' pathway in parasitic worms that could one day lead to new treatments for one of the world's most serious and prevalent diseases. Dr Erinna Lee and Dr Doug Fairlie from the institute's Structural Biology division study programmed cell death (also called apoptosis) in human cells. They have recently started studying the process in schistosomes, parasitic fluke worms responsible...

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2011-05-24 09:44:01

By Carol Clark, Emory University Mummies from along the Nile are revealing how age-old irrigation techniques may have boosted the plague of schistosomiasis, a water-borne parasitic disease that infects an estimated 200 million people today. An analysis of the mummies from Nubia, a former kingdom that was located in present-day Sudan, provides details for the first time about the prevalence of the disease across populations in ancient times, and how human alteration of the environment during...

2010-11-08 16:32:49

Scientists have made a significant discovery about how the body defends itself against snail fever, a parasitic worm infection common in developing countries Scientists have made a significant discovery about how the body defends itself against snail fever, a parasitic worm infection common in developing countries. Researchers studied the immune response in mice infected with snail fever parasites. They found that a particular type of immune cell, known as the dendritic cell, is responsible...

2010-10-28 14:27:30

Faculty of Life Sciences at the University of Copenhagen shows that the parasitic disease, commonly known as snail fever, or schistosomiasis, almost eats its way into women's reproductive organs. Today researchers from all over the world are gathering in Copenhagen to find out what can be done to halt the disease which is affecting millions of women in Africa. Six hundred million people in, for example, Africa live with the daily risk of being infected with the parasitic disease...

2010-05-19 11:17:22

A debate published this week in PLoS Medicine examines new approaches to tackling neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), with three viewpoints from experts in the field arguing which approach shows most promise. Jerry Spiegel and colleagues from the University of British Columbia argue that there has been too much focus on biomedical mechanisms and drug development for NTDs, which has come at the expense of the social determinants of health such as clean water, sanitation, good housing, and...

2009-10-27 11:31:24

It is possible to simultaneously survey a number of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the challenging environment of Southern Sudan, according to a new study published October 27 in the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. The research, coordinated by Malaria Consortium Africa on behalf of the government of Southern Sudan, rapidly identified areas requiring mass treatment for schistosomiasis and intestinal worm infections, and showed that two diseases, lymphatic...

2009-09-23 09:52:00

NEW YORK, Sept. 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- At the Clinton Global Initiative today, the Inter-American Development Bank joined with the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases to announce their commitment to mobilize $30 million from the public and private sectors to raise awareness and funding for NTD control and elimination in the Americas, supported by technical assistance from the Pan American Health Organization, regional office of the World Health Organization for the...

2009-08-17 13:10:13

A U.S. scientist says he has completed the first genetic linkage map for Schistosoma mansoni -- a blood parasite linked with schistosomiasis. S. mansoni is a complex and aggressive pathogen affecting more than 90 million people in Africa, the Middle East and South America, Texas A&M University Assistant Professor Charles Criscione said. Schistosomiasis is a debilitating, chronic disease that can damage internal organs and impair growth in children. Criscione and his team of researchers...


Latest schistosomiasis Reference Libraries

Schistosoma mansoni
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Schistosoma mansoni is a species of parasitic worm, classified within the Platyhelminthes phylum, which affects an estimated 83.31 million throughout the world. This species is the most populous of all members of its genus, occurring in fifty-four countries including areas like Africa, the Middle East, South America, and the Caribbean. This species causes intestinal schistosomiasis in humans. The mapped genome of Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum were published in 2009. The associated...

Schistosoma haematobium
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Schistosoma haematobium is a species of trematode flatworm, more commonly known as a fluke that can be found in Portugal, the Middle East, Africa, and India. This species is one a few fluke species that can give humans schistosomiasis, most commonly the kind known as urinary schistosomiasis. This species will swim around in water in its larval form known as cercariae. In this stage of life, it is able to push through a human host’s skin when the host is swimming in contaminated waters. Once...

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Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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