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Latest Scolopacidae Stories

2009-08-07 14:05:11

A bar-tailed godwit, a bird banded near Victoria, Australia, was found more than 8,000 miles away in the western Arctic area of Alaska, wildlife experts said. While tagged birds are sometimes seen in the region where they were released, it's rare to see them so far from a release site, Wildlife Conservation Society scientists said in a release Friday. While we know that birds from all over the world come to the Arctic to breed, to see a living example first hand is a powerful reminder of the...

2008-09-11 18:00:17

By DAN SVINGEN The weather is cooling. The kids are studying. The harvest is roaring. The shotguns are shining. These iconic images proclaim that autumn is soon upon us. For some of our fellow creatures, however, that is hardly a news flash. Incredible as it may seem, many arctic-nesting shorebirds began their "fall" migration in early July. For most such species, adult females were the first to depart the top of the world, leaving their mates to shepherd the tiny puffball chicks...

2008-07-27 03:00:23

By Michael Pearce, The Wichita Eagle, Kan. Jul. 27--With temperatures hovering around 100, winter may be the furthest thing from most human minds. It's obviously on the mind of some shorebirds. Some have already begun their southward fall migration. Jim Sellers, Quivira National Wildlife Refuge assistant manager, said more will be on the move shortly. He's predicting a great gathering of everything from assorted sandpipers to phalaropes at the refuge. "We're already picking up...

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2008-02-14 11:31:08

A Conservation group is optimistic after receiving news that 84 spoon-billed sandpipers were spotted on the coast in Myanmar. The World Conservation Union states that the bird is endangered, with only 200 to 300 pairs remaining. A few months prior to the latest discovery of the bird with its distinctive spoon-like bill, Russian researchers reported a 70 percent drop in the number spotted in their normal breeding sites in Siberia also noting that none were seen this year in Bangladesh, their...


Latest Scolopacidae Reference Libraries

Spotted Sandpiper, Actitis macularius
2013-10-03 09:18:30

The Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) is a shorebird of small size. It measures 18 to 20 centimeters long. In addition with its sister species, the Common Sandpiper, they make up the genus Actitis. They replace each other geographically; stray birds may settle with breeders of the other species and hybridize. Their breeding habitat is close by fresh water across most of Canada and the United States. They migrate to the southern United States and South America, and are very rare...

Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Eurynorhynchus pygmeus
2012-09-12 11:48:41

The spoon-billed sandpiper (Eurynorhynchus pygmeus) can be found in Southeast Asia in the winter and northeastern Russia during its breeding season in warmer months. In Russia, its breeding range includes the sea coats adjacent to the Chukchi Peninsula and south to the Kamchatka peninsula. It will migrate through many areas along the Pacific Coast including Japan, North and South Korea, and China to get to its main wintering range. In this area of Southeast Asia, it can be found in many areas...

600px-Eurasian_Curlew
2012-04-03 14:06:48

The Eurasian Curlew, (Numenius arquata), is a species of wading bird in the Scolopacidae family. It is one of the most widespread species of curlews, breeding across much of temperate Europe and Asia. This bird is commonly known as just “the Curlew” in Europe, and “the whaup” in Scotland. The Eurasian Curlew is migratory over most of its range, wintering in Africa, southern Europe and south Asia. It is a rare vagrant to Nova Scotia and the Marianas. In the milder climates of its...

Bristle-thighed Curlew
2012-04-02 19:48:35

The Bristle-thighed Curlew, (Numenius tahitiensis), is a species of bird found in Alaska during the breeding season, and throughout the tropical Pacific islands in the winter, including Micronesia, Fiji, Tuvalu, Tonga, Hawaiian Islands, Samoa, and French Polynesia. There is some concern over human encroachment and introduced predators in this bird’s wintering habitat. This bird is a rare visitor to Canada and the Pacific US during the breeding season. The Bristle-thighed Curlew was first...

Black Turnstone, Arenaria melanocephala
2012-04-02 19:06:21

The Black Turnstone, (Arenaria melanocephala), is a species of wading bird in the sandpiper family Scolopacidae. It was formerly placed in the plover family Charadriidae. It is one of two species in the genus Arenaria; the other being the Ruddy Turnstone (A. interpres). The Black Turnstone is native to western North America and breeds only in Alaska from the Alaskan Peninsula in the south to Point Hope in the north. Most of the population nests in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. It usually...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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