Quantcast

Latest Scorpaenidae Stories

2011-01-25 10:11:00

DALLAS, Jan. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Tonight's "Dan Rather Reports" presents an investigation into the invasion of lionfish in the Western Atlantic and Caribbean waters and how this spiny fish with a voracious appetite could spell disaster not only for delicate ocean eco-systems but also for the commercial fishing industry. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20080324/HDNETLOGO) With their vibrant zebra stripes and needle sharp spines filled with venom, lionfish, look like...

539808c38363e34409ffbb11c16ca5bc1
2010-12-30 12:10:00

Florida marine conservationists have come to the conclusion that the best way to put an end to the lionfish invasion in the state's waters is to eat them, according to a recent Reuters report. The REEF conservation organization released "The Lionfish Cookbook," which is a collection of 45 recipes, in order to counter an invasion of the fish in Florida waters. "It's absolutely good eating -- a delicacy. It's delicately flavored white meat, very buttery," Lad Akins, director of special...

2010-09-20 18:05:00

GULF SHORES, Ala., Sept. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Don Childress proudly announces the launch of The Childress Foundation and Research Group, Inc. (an applied for 501(c)(3) non-profit organization) to immediately and effectively take action to mitigate the lionfish invasion along the warmer regions of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. Based in Gulf Shores, Alabama, The Childress Foundation and Research Group's mission is to promote and protect our marine environment by building awareness and...

026200f284406b0b00ebafbfcd79468d1
2010-08-08 21:28:19

Divers identified and killed a 15 cm long lionfish in Fish Bay along the southern coast of St. John, making this the fourth such capture and kill of the invasive fish in the Virgin Islands National Park.The lionfish was first spotted July 15, 2010 and captured the following day within 10 meters of the original sighting. A team of divers and scientists from NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the National Park Service were in the area collecting data aimed at evaluating the...

2009-06-24 09:26:17

Marine biologists in Florida say they have official confirmation the venomous lionfish has spread down the Atlantic Coast to Miami. Divers from Biscayne National Park captured the invader from the Pacific in the bow of a freighter 60 feet below the surface after a sport diver reported sighting a zebra-striped fish, the Miami Herald reported Wednesday. Terry Helmers, a park diver, said it took two dives to find the fish in the scattered debris. We probably all swam past it a couple of times,...

2009-05-05 19:28:44

The disappearance of sharks, barracuda and other large predators from Caribbean reefs is related to the growing human population, a Florida researcher says. Chris Stallings, a post-doctoral researcher at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory, compared populations of 20 predatory species of fish on the reefs of 22 Caribbean countries. His results were to be published Wednesday in the journal PLoS One. I found that nations with more people have reefs with far fewer large...

2008-09-25 00:00:18

U.S. scientists are looking at ways to control lionfish that are making themselves at home along the South Atlantic seaboard. The Pacific Ocean native is considered the perfect predator in the Atlantic Ocean because it has no known enemies and a voracious appetite, the Palm Beach (Fla.) Post reported Wednesday. Scientists said a reappearance of the fish off West Palm Beach has ignited fears of a full-scale invasion that could decimate populations of smaller fish. Lisa Mitchell of the Reef...

9ecd917fa6ad1e140c12fb107e44c5a31
2008-08-15 09:30:00

A red lionfish is quickly multiplying in the warm waters of the Caribbean, wreaking havoc on the ecologically delicate area.  The lionfish, an 18-inch maroon-striped marauder with venomous spikes, is stinging divers and swallowing native species from the coasts of Cuba to Little Cayman's unspoiled Bloody Bay Wall. The area is one of the region's prime destinations for divers.    The red lionfish, a white creature with maroon stripes, is a tropical native of the Indian and...

2008-08-15 00:00:20

By David McFadden WIDENING WOE IN WATER Invasive fish is big-time bad news for sensitive region A maroon-striped marauder with venomous spikes is rapidly multiplying in the Caribbean's warm waters, swallowing native species, stinging divers and generally wreaking havoc on an ecologically delicate region. The red lionfish, a tropical native of the Indian and Pacific oceans that probably escaped from a Florida fish tank, is showing up everywhere - from the coasts of Cuba and Hispaniola...

2008-08-14 21:00:17

By David McFadden SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - A maroon-striped marauder with venomous spikes is rapidly multiplying in the Caribbean's warm waters, swallowing native species and stinging divers in an ecologically delicate region. The red lionfish, a tropical native of the Indian and Pacific oceans that probably escaped from a Florida fish tank, is showing up everywhere - from the coasts of Cuba and Hispaniola to Little Cayman's pristine Bloody Bay Wall, one of the region's prime destinations...


Latest Scorpaenidae Reference Libraries

Common lionfish, Pterois miles
2014-06-13 13:45:25

The common lionfish (Pterois miles) or devil firefish is a species of fish native to the western Indo-Pacific region and a close relative to red lionfish (Pterois volitans), which it is often confused with. Its distribution includes the Indian Ocean from the Red Sea to South Africa and to Indonesia and recently, in the South Eastern Mediterranean Sea near Cyprus. Off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea, the common lionfish is considered an invasive species. Its...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
Related