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Latest Scotinomys Stories

Singing Mice Use High-pitched Tunes To Protect Their Turf
2013-09-26 11:05:02

[ Watch the Video: Alston’s Singing Mouse ] University of Texas at Austin Two species of tawny brown singing mice that live deep in the mountain cloud forests of Costa Rica and Panama set their boundaries by emitting high-pitched trills, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered. Although males of both the Alston's singing mouse (Scotinomys teguina) and Chiriqui singing mouse (S. xerampelinus) sing to attract mates and repel rivals within their respective...


Latest Scotinomys Reference Libraries

Sumichrast's Vesper Rat, Nyctomys sumichrasti
2012-07-05 10:08:58

Sumichrast's vesper rat (Nyctomys sumichrasti) can be found in a range that extends from southern Mexico into Panama. It is an arboreal rodent, an odd occurrence in nature, preferring to build nests out of leaves and twigs in the trees. It is most active at night, making it a nocturnal rodent. The main diet of this rat consists of plant materials such as figs and avocados. Sumichrast's vesper rat can have an average body length of up to 5.1 inches, and tail length between 3.3 and 6.1...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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