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Latest Sea level Stories

2009-03-11 12:13:43

Scientists at a Denmark conference say rising sea levels will have a major negative impact on 1-in-10 humans living in the Earth's low-lying coastal areas. Research presented during this week's International Scientific Congress on Climate Change in Copenhagen shows the upper range of sea level rise by 2100 could be in the range of about 1 meter (3 feet) or possibly more. At the lower end of the spectrum, studies show it is increasingly unlikely sea level rise will be much less than 50...

2009-03-04 09:13:51

A German study suggests human water consumption is causing an alarming drop in Dead Sea water levels, with serious environmental consequences. Shahrazad Abu Ghazleh and colleagues at the University of Technology in Darmstadt, Germany, said the lower water levels in the Dead Sea -- the deepest point on Earth -- can impact the area's ability to generate electricity and produce fresh water by desalinization. The researchers said normally the water levels of closed lakes such as the Dead Sea...

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2009-02-27 07:35:00

A team of Yale geologists has a new perspective on the greenhouse-to-icehouse shift where global climate changed from an ice-free world to one with massive ice sheets in the Antarctic nearly 34 million years ago. The study, which is detailed in the February issue of Science, disproves a long-held theory that massive ice growth was accompanied by very little global temperature change. According to the report, there was an estimated 18°F drop in latitude temperatures, and nearly as great a...

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2009-02-16 15:42:18

The Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are melting, but the amounts that will melt and the time it will take are still unknown, according to Richard Alley, Evan Pugh professor of geosciences, Penn State. In the past, the Greenland ice sheet has grown when its surroundings cooled, shrunk when its surroundings warmed and even disappeared completely when the temperatures became warm enough. If the ice sheet on Greenland melts, sea level will rise about 23 feet, which will inundate portions of...

2009-02-16 11:04:04

A U.S. geoscientist says although it's known the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are melting, how much ice will melt is undetermined. Penn State Professor Richard Alley said if Greenland's ice sheet melts, sea level will rise about 23 feet, which will inundate portions of nearly all continental shores. However, Antarctica, containing much more water, could add another 190 feet to sea level. We do not think that we will lose all, or even most, of Antarctica's ice sheet, said Alley. But...

2009-02-11 12:13:55

U.S. scientists say they have found proof that Earth's sea level was more than 70 feet (21 meters) higher 400,000 years ago than it is now. Storrs Olson, a zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, and geologist Paul Hearty of the Bald Head Island Conservancy said they discovered sedimentary and fossil evidence in the walls of a limestone quarry in Bermuda that documents the rise in sea level during an interglacial period of the Middle Pleistocene. Although Hearty and...

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2009-02-06 11:52:42

Sea levels could rise up to 21 feet in certain regions, according to a new report that takes into account new previously unconsidered factors. Geophysicists from the University of Toronto have previously reported that coastlines of North America and of nations in the southern Indian Ocean could face the greatest threats from a West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse. But in a new report, scientists found that some estimates failed to take certain factors into account. "We aren't suggesting that a...

2009-01-28 13:11:02

The Dead Sea lies in a basin structure situated below the sea level. This deep subsidence is a result of a tectonic concurrence between processes in the upper lithosphere that led to subsiding and a compensating upward flow of rocks in the deeper layers of the lithosphere. This is a result presented by A. Petrunin and A. Sobolev from the GFZ - German Research Centre for Geosciences in the current issue of "PHYSICS OF THE EARTH AND PLANETARY INTERIORS" (Vol. 171, S. 387 - 399). In a series of...

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2009-01-23 11:05:00

Did a catastrophic flood of biblical proportions drown the shores of the Black Sea 9,500 years ago, wiping out early Neolithic settlements around its perimeter? A geologist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and two Romanian colleagues report in the January issue of Quaternary Science Reviews that, if the flood occurred at all, it was much smaller than previously proposed by other researchers. Using sediment cores from the delta of the Danube River, which empties into the...

2009-01-22 00:19:40

A U.S. study suggests North Carolina is one of the states that will be hurt the most by a substantial rise in sea-level. Lead author Jim Titus of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the sandy shore of the mid-Atlantic will erode faster than other coastal areas. The Outer Banks is at particular risk, The (Raleigh, N.C.) News & Observer reported Wednesday. The report suggests the sea-level could rise anywhere from 16 inches to about 3 feet by 2100. Earlier estimates, which...


Latest Sea level Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

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2010-11-15 18:22:54

A radar altimeter measures altitude above the terrain beneath an aircraft as opposed to a barometric altimeter which provides the distance above a pre-determined datum, usually sea level. Radar is the underpinning principle of the system. Radio waves that are reflected back from the ground are timed in order to calculate speed, distance, and time which are related to the each other and can be used to calculate the distance from one point to another. Lloyd Espenschied invented the radar...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.