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Latest Sea level Stories

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2011-08-24 12:22:44

  An Update from NASA's Sea Level Sentinels: Like mercury in a thermometer, ocean waters expand as they warm. This, along with melting glaciers and ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, drives sea levels higher over the long term. For the past 18 years, the U.S./French Jason-1, Jason-2 and Topex/Poseidon spacecraft have been monitoring the gradual rise of the world's ocean in response to global warming. While the rise of the global ocean has been remarkably steady for most of...

2011-08-18 14:57:00

WASHINGTON, Aug. 18, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA-funded researchers have created the first complete map of the speed and direction of ice flow in Antarctica. The map, which shows glaciers flowing thousands of miles from the continent's deep interior to its coast, will be critical for tracking future sea-level increases from climate change. The team created the map using integrated radar observations from a consortium of international satellites. (Logo:...

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2011-08-02 08:46:42

An analysis of prehistoric "Heinrich events" that happened many thousands of years ago, creating mass discharges of icebergs into the North Atlantic Ocean, make it clear that very small amounts of subsurface warming of water can trigger a rapid collapse of ice shelves. The findings, to be published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provide historical evidence that warming of water by 3-4 degrees was enough to trigger these huge, episodic discharges of ice from the...

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2011-07-29 09:35:00

Bt Jill Sakai, University of Wisconsin-Madison During the last prolonged warm spell on Earth, the oceans were at least four meters "“ and possibly as much as 6.5 meters, or about 20 feet "“ higher than they are now. Where did all that extra water come from? Mainly from melting ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica, and many scientists, including University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience assistant professor Anders Carlson, have expected that Greenland was the main culprit. But...

2011-07-25 09:10:00

GREENBELT, Md., July 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An international team of researchers has combined data from multiple sources to provide the clearest account yet of how much glacial ice surges into the sea following the collapse of Antarctic ice shelves. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The work by researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Laboratoire d'Etudes en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiales, Centre National de...

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2011-07-18 14:12:07

Melting ice sheets contributed much more to rising sea levels than thermal expansion of warming ocean waters during the Last Interglacial Period, a UA-led team of researchers has found By Daniel Stolte, University of Arizona Thermal expansion of seawater contributed only slightly to rising sea levels compared to melting ice sheets during the Last Interglacial Period, a University of Arizona-led team of researchers has found. The study combined paleoclimate records with computer simulations of...

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2011-07-17 07:31:08

Study on Jakobshavn Isbrae supports growing evidence that calving glaciers are particularly sensitive to climate change Large, marine-calving glaciers have the ability not only to shrink rapidly in response to global warming, but to grow at a remarkable pace during periods of global cooling, according to University at Buffalo geologists working in Greenland. The conclusion stems from new research on Jakobshavn Isbrae, a tongue of ice extending out to sea from Greenland's west coast. Through...

2011-07-13 12:37:05

Fresh research into glaciers could help scientists better predict the impact of changing climates on global sea levels Fresh research into glaciers could help scientists better predict the impact of changing climates on global sea levels. Scientists have shown for the first time that the terrain beneath glaciers influences how much glacier melt contributes to fluctuations in sea levels. Researchers say the study will improve their understanding of how ice sheet movements have affected sea...

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2011-07-04 05:05:00

Sea levels could be rising faster than scientists originally believed, thanks to the warming subsurface waters that could cause more rapid melting of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, researchers from the University of Arizona are claiming. In a new study, University of Arizona Assistant Professor of Geosciences Jianjun Yin and colleagues analyzed 19 different climate models under which global warming would accelerate the melting of the world's largest ice sheets over the next two...

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2011-06-21 06:05:00

A consistent link exists between changes in global mean surface temperature and sea level, resulting in a greater rate of sea-level rise along the U.S. Atlantic coast than that of the past 2,000 years, says an international research team. "Sea-level rise is a potentially disastrous outcome of climate change, as rising temperatures melt land-based iced and warm ocean waters," says Benjamin Horton, associate professor and director of the Sea Level Research Laboratory at the University of...


Latest Sea level Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

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2010-11-15 18:22:54

A radar altimeter measures altitude above the terrain beneath an aircraft as opposed to a barometric altimeter which provides the distance above a pre-determined datum, usually sea level. Radar is the underpinning principle of the system. Radio waves that are reflected back from the ground are timed in order to calculate speed, distance, and time which are related to the each other and can be used to calculate the distance from one point to another. Lloyd Espenschied invented the radar...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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