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Latest Sea level Stories

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2011-05-03 11:40:00

According to an international report, climate change in the Arctic could raise world sea levels to 5 feet by 2100. A rise like this would threaten the coasts from Bangladesh to Florida, low-lying Pacific islands and cities from London to Shanghai.  It would also raise costs of building tsunami barriers in Japan. "The past six years (until 2010) have been the warmest period ever recorded in the Arctic," according to the Oslo-based Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP). "In...

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2011-04-20 14:20:00

According to a new study, melting glaciers and ice caps on Canadian Arctic islands play a much greater role in sea level rise than scientists previously thought. There are bout 30,000 islands within the 550,000-square-mile Canadian Arctic Archipelago.  The study found that between 2004 and 2009, the region lost the equivalent of three-quarters of the water in Lake Erie. Alex Gardner, a research fellow in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences at the University of...

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2011-04-09 06:05:00

New forecasts on rising sea levels suggest that New York will be a big loser, while some regions, including those closer to polar regions, will win big, reports BBC News.. A 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecast sea levels to rise by as much as 1 foot by 2100. But that forecast was a global average. A Dutch team has now made an attempt to model all the factors leading to regional variations. And whatever the global figure turns out to be, there will be...

2011-03-15 12:00:00

WASHINGTON, March 15, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers and flight crew arrived in Thule, Greenland, on Monday, March 14, for the start of NASA's 2011 Operation IceBridge, an airborne mission to study changes in Arctic polar ice. This year's plans include surveys of Canadian ice caps and expanded international collaboration. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The state of Earth's polar ice sheets, glaciers and sea ice is an important indicator of...

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2011-03-09 08:45:00

Ice sheets have been losing mass at an accelerated rate over the past two decades, and these changes could soon become the dominant contributor to rising global sea levels, a NASA-funded study has discovered. The results of the nearly 20-year satellite research project--the longest study ever to track changes in polar ice sheet mass--showed that ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic lost an average of 475 gigatons of combined mass annually. Each gigaton is roughly equal to 2.2 trillion...

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2011-02-15 11:00:00

Rising sea levels could threaten an average of 9 percent of the land within 180 US coastal cities by 2100, according to new research led by University of Arizona scientists. The Gulf and southern Atlantic coasts will be particularly affected. The cities of Miami, New Orleans, Tampa, Fla., and Virginia Beach, Va. could lose more than 10 percent of their land area by 2100. This is the first analysis of vulnerability to sea-level rise that includes every US coastal city in the lower 48 with a...

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2011-01-27 09:26:45

Hotter summers may not be as catastrophic for the Greenland ice sheet as previously feared and may actually slow down the flow of glaciers, according to new research. A letter published in Nature on 27 January explains how increased melting in warmer years causes the internal drainage system of the ice sheet to 'adapt' and accommodate more melt-water, without speeding up the flow of ice toward the oceans. The findings have important implications for future assessments of global sea level...

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2011-01-21 13:55:00

Scientists reported on Friday that Greenland's icesheet shed a record amount of melted snow and ice in 2010. The study found that the 2010 runoff was twice the average annual loss in Greenland over the previous three decades, surpassing a record set in 2007. According to the paper, ice melt has now topped this benchmark every year since 1996. Greenland's icesheet could drive up ocean levels by about 23 feet if it melted, drowning coastal cities around the world. No credible projections...

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2011-01-13 10:48:05

New NASA satellite data indicate the current La Niña event in the eastern Pacific has remained strong during November and December 2010. A new Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 satellite image of the Pacific Ocean that averaged 10 days of data was just released from NASA. The image, centered on Dec. 26, 2010, was created at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. "The solid record of La Niña strength only goes back about...

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2010-12-22 08:08:26

By David Malmquist, Virginia Institute of Marine Science A new study of local sea-level trends by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) brings both good and bad news to localities concerned with coastal inundation and flooding along the shores of Chesapeake Bay. Dr. John Boon, the study's lead author, says the good news is that "absolute sea level in Chesapeake Bay is rising only about half as fast as the global average rise rate." The bad news, says Boon, is that...


Latest Sea level Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

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2010-11-15 18:22:54

A radar altimeter measures altitude above the terrain beneath an aircraft as opposed to a barometric altimeter which provides the distance above a pre-determined datum, usually sea level. Radar is the underpinning principle of the system. Radio waves that are reflected back from the ground are timed in order to calculate speed, distance, and time which are related to the each other and can be used to calculate the distance from one point to another. Lloyd Espenschied invented the radar...

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