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Latest Sea otter Stories

2006-02-18 18:05:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent ST. LOUIS -- A parasite carried in cat droppings may be killing otters off the California coast, researchers said on Saturday. Other studies on marine mammals released on Saturday found that a virus may be causing cancer in seals and toxins from red tides that are a known threat to the endangered manatee may also harm people. The otter study may help explain why populations of the frisky animals have not recovered from the 19th-century fur...

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2005-08-09 05:35:02

ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- Southwest Alaska's sea otters, which came back from the brink of extinction in the 1800s, are facing another dramatic decline and could be named a "threatened" species as early as Tuesday. There are no clear answers why the population across a wide swath of Alaska has plummeted or how to reverse the decline, said Douglas Burn, leader of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's sea otter program. "It is a complex task, partly because we don't know with 100 percent certainty...


Latest Sea otter Reference Libraries

Marine Otter, Lontra feline
2012-12-28 15:09:41

The marine otter (Lontra feline) is a member of the weasel family, and can be found in South America. It prefers a habitat in rocky coastal areas, with a range that includes the entire coastline of Chile and extends to southern Peru and Argentina. It has been found on the Falkland Islands, but individuals here do not represent a constant population. Unlike other species of otter, the marine otter chooses to live near waters with high winds and swells. It may use caves and crevices as dens,...

Steller Sea Lion, Eumetopias jubatus
2012-11-01 07:34:19

The Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) is a species that can be found in the northern Pacific. It is also known as Steller's sea lion or the northern sea lion and is the only member of its genus, Eumetopias. Its range stretches from Gulf of Alaska to the Sea of Okhotsk and the Kuril Islands in Russia. Its southern range includes Año Nuevo Island near California. Although it once bred as far south as the Channel Islands, it has not been seen there since the 1980’s. Traditionally,...

Spotted-necked Otter, Hydrictis maculicollis
2012-05-18 14:35:16

The spotted-necked otter (Hydrictis maculicollis) is native to sub-Saharan Africa. It is sometimes called the speckle-throated otter. It can be found throughout Zambia and in Lake Victoria. Despite the abundance of suitable habitats, these otters are not found in east Africa or below Victorian Falls in Zambezi. They prefer to live around lakes or large rivers. Although the range of this otter is quite large, bushmeat hunting, habitat destruction, and pollution are causing populations to...

Oriental Small-clawed Otter, Aonyx cinerea
2012-05-18 14:29:41

The oriental small-clawed otter (Aonyx cinerea) is also known as the Asian small-clawed otter. The range of this otter includes Burma, Bangladesh, India, Taiwan, Laos, southern China, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Malaysia. This otter was thought to be a single member in the genus Amblonyx, but it has been recently classified as Aonyx due to research on its mitochondrial DNA. The oriental small-clawed otter prefers to live in freshwater wetlands and mangrove swamps...

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2009-02-16 19:21:24

The African Clawless Otter (Aonyx capensis), also known as the Cape Clawless Otter or Groot Otter, is a species of freshwater otter found through most of sub-Saharan Africa, except for the Congo basin and other arid areas. They are found near permanent bodies of water in savannah and lowland forests. They can also be found anywhere from open coastal plains, to semiarid regions, to dense forest areas. Logs, branches, and loose foliage greatly appeal to the otter as it provides shelter, shade...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.