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Latest Seabirds Stories

emperor penguins
2014-06-30 04:52:56

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In less than 100 years, global warming’s impact on the sea ice where emperor penguins breed will result in the loss of at least one-fifth of the species’ population, according to new research appearing in the June 29 edition of the journal Nature Climate Change. There are currently 600,000 emperor penguins living in Antarctica and populations in 45 known colonies are expected to increase slightly by 2050 before declining over...

2014-05-07 10:50:42

The sight of seabirds following trawlers in order to feast from discarded fish is a common maritime sight, but each year many thousands of seabirds are killed by overhanging cables or in nets. New research in Animal Conservation assesses mortality figures from South Africa to show that a simple bird scaring line can reduce the mortality rate by over 90%. The research compiled data from five years of observations to compare current and historic mortality rates. Previous research shows that...

Changing Eating Habits Of The Hawaiian Petrel And Other Sea Birds Concern Scientists
2013-05-14 08:29:00

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Changes in the eating habits of endangered Hawaiian petrels have scientists concerned about the impact that the growth of industrialized fishing will have not only on the seabirds but upon other species of animals as well. Researchers from Michigan State University (MSU) and the Smithsonian Institution (SI) looked at both ancient and modern remains of the birds, which spent much of their lives foraging for food in the Pacific...

2013-03-14 17:51:12

Species of seabirds could successfully return to their natural foraging habits following changes to European fisheries policies, scientists have suggested. The European Parliament recently voted to scrap the controversial discards policy, which has seen fishermen throwing thousands of edible fish and fish waste back into the sea because they have exceeded their quotas. Scientists at Plymouth University believe this could have a negative impact on some seabirds, which have become used to...

Miracle On The Midway
2013-02-07 05:53:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online On December 10, 1956, a five-year-old Laysan albatross was tagged at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Last week, at the age of 62, Wisdom, the world's oldest living wild bird, and her mate hatched a healthy chick at Midway. Wisdom was spotted sitting on her nest on November 29, 2012 by a Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, and her return to the Wildlife Refuge was greeted with wonder. The average Laysan albatross dies at less...

Penguin Huddles Similar To Fluid Dynamics
2012-11-18 07:27:29

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you fell in love with the movie “March of the Penguins”, you are in good company. Francois Blanchette, a mathematician at the University of California — Merced (UCM) found inspiration in this masterful and adorable documentary for his new study that was published this week in the online open source journal PLOS ONE. The researchers will also discuss their findings at the annual meeting of the American Physical...

2012-09-14 23:00:19

Lifelong boater Bob Alves creates life-like predator to keep birds away. Marblehead, MA (PRWEB) September 14, 2012 Gulls and other birds might provide the perfect photo-op for vacationers, but for boat owners there is no romance in the slippery refuse they leave behind. It´s no fun spending hours cleaning bird residue off your boat or dock before shoving-off. Bob Alves, founder of “Gulls Gotta Go”, created a solution to this problem based on his lifetime experience on the...

2012-09-06 10:18:54

Albatrosses leverage the energy of the wind to fly with essentially no mechanical cost to themselves, very rarely flapping their wings, and new work published Sep. 5 in the open access journal PLOS ONE offers insight into how exactly they accomplish this feat. The researchers, led by Gottfried Sachs of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen and Francesco Bonadonna of the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), used advanced GPS tracking to determine that the energy gain during...

When Do Youngsters Fly The Nest?
2012-07-06 09:45:31

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online As seabirds mature and reach a time where they can fly the nest, their parents begin to feed them less each day. However, according to researchers from the University of Leeds, it is actually hormones that control when the chicks will leave home. In their study, the researchers wanted to pinpoint the main trigger which causes chicks to leave the nest and get on to an independent life, a process known as fledging. While studying...

Antarctic Albatross Displays Shift In Breeding Habits
2012-04-30 08:34:58

A new study of the wandering albatross — one of the largest birds on Earth — has shown that some of the birds are breeding earlier in the season compared with 30 years ago. Reporting online this month (April) in the journal Oikos, a British team of scientists describe how they studied the breeding habits of the wandering albatross on the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia. They have discovered that because some birds are now laying their eggs earlier, the laying date for the...


Latest Seabirds Reference Libraries

Lesser Frigatebird, Fregata ariel
2013-04-23 22:58:32

The Lesser Frigatebird (Fregata ariel) is a species of frigate bird. In nests in Australia, along with other locations. There is a single recording from the Western Palearctic, from Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba. The Lesser Frigatebird or Least Frigatebird is said to be the most common and widespread frigate bird in the Australian seas. It’s common in tropical seas breeding on isolated islands, including Christmas Island located in the Indian Ocean in recent years. These birds are most...

Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregata magnificens
2013-04-23 14:48:18

The Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) was occasionally previously known as Man O’War or man of War, a reflection of its rakish lines, aerial piracy of other birds, and speed. It’s widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in the trees in Florida, the Caribbean and the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, it breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands, as well. It is known as a vagrant as far from its...

Tristram’s Storm Petrel, Oceanodroma tristrami
2013-04-22 14:33:05

The Tristram’s Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma tristrami) is a species of seabird in the family of storm-petrels called Hydrobatidae. The species’ specific and common name comes from the English clergyman Henry Baker Tristram, the species can also be known as the Sooty Storm-petrel. The Tristram’s Storm Petrel is distribution across the North Pacific Ocean; mainly in tropical seas. This storm-petrel has long angular wings and is 24 cm long. The plumage is dark all over with a slightly pale...

Buller’s Shearwater, Puffinus bulleri
2013-04-21 09:09:37

The Buller’s Shearwater (puffinus bulleri) is a Pacific species of seabird in the Procellariidae family; it is also known as the Grey-backed Shearwater or New Zealand Shearwater. It is a member of the black-billed wedge-tailed Thyellodroma group, among the bigger shearwaters of the proposed genus Ardenna; it creates a superspecies with the Wedge-tailed Shearwater. The adult birds are 46 to 47 cm in length, with a 97 to 99 cm wingspan, and they have been recorded to weigh 342 to 435g. The...

Black Petrel, Procellaria parkinsoni
2013-04-21 09:01:42

The Black Petrel (Procellaria parkinsoni) is also called the Parkinson’s Petrel. It is a large, black petrel, the smallest of the Procellaria. This species is an endemic breeder of New Zealand, breeding only on islands off the North Island, on Great Barrier Island and Little Barrier Island. At sea it scatters as far as Australia and Ecuador. It’s a medium-sized, all black petrel except for pale sections on the bill. The wingspan is 110 cm on average. This bird is usually seen in the...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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