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e588d61ec4f7d4e085778e4532ea617d
2011-05-04 08:15:19

Sandia researchers develop tiny laser that reduced power consumption 1,000-fold A matchbook-sized atomic clock 100 times smaller than its commercial predecessors has been created by a team of researchers at Symmetricom Inc. Draper Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. The portable Chip Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC) "” only about 1.5 inches on a side and less than a half-inch in depth "” also requires 100 times less power than its predecessors. Instead of 10 watts, it uses only...

30aa946d8b5d84b1a299a63100e129d7
2010-02-05 13:22:06

Clock keeps time to 1 second in 3.7 billion years Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built an enhanced version of an experimental atomic clock based on a single aluminum atom that is now the world's most precise clock, more than twice as precise as the previous pacesetter based on a mercury atom. The new aluminum clock would neither gain nor lose one second in about 3.7 billion years, according to measurements to be reported in Physical Review...

2009-12-23 10:14:14

The world's best caesium atomic clocks control Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), an atomic time scale on which the time zones used in everyday life are based. But also in navigation (GPS), astronomy, telecommunications, geodesy and physical fundamental research, accurate timing is of essential importance. Until recently, three of PTB's clocks belonged to the exclusive club of primary caesium atomic clocks. Now a fourth one, the caesium fountain clock CSF2, has joined in. This month, its data...

81774604b3b79ade65ca4817c54b01de
2009-09-03 10:43:06

PTB researchers want to construct the "atomic clock of the future" much more simply and more compactly than the previous elaborate laboratory set-ups You imagine a clock to be different - yet the optical table with its many complicated set-ups really is one. Optical clocks like the strontium clock in the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig could be the atomic clocks of the future; some of them though are already ten times more precise and stable than the best primary...

823e0f96bb3e2d0115d1b854e5d047d91
2009-08-11 16:30:00

An experimental atomic clock based on ytterbium atoms is about four times more accurate than it was several years ago, giving it a precision comparable to that of the NIST-F1 cesium fountain clock, the nation's civilian time standard, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report in Physical Review Letters.*NIST scientists evaluated the clock by measuring the natural frequency of ytterbium, carefully accounting for all possible deviations such as those caused...

5d910f1c30fbf932de9867aba990aaec1
2009-05-21 07:37:27

Researchers have figured out how to nullify collision effects and make the clock still more precise To accurately measure tiny intervals of time, you need a clock that ticks very fast and very precisely. For the ultimate in accuracy, scientists reach for atoms, or more precisely, an exactly known frequency of light emitted by a chosen atom. The 'ticks' are the crests of a light wave, which rises and falls as many as a thousand trillion times per second. In an effort to improve the already...

2009-04-13 09:53:47

Institute of Quantum Electronics, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, has proposed the concept, principles and techniques of active optical clock. The study is reported in Issue 54 (February, 2009) of Chinese Science Bulletin because of its significant research value. Up to date, all realize that optical clocks are based on the laser absorption spectroscopy. Thus the available laser with narrowest linewidth limits the linewidth of state-of-the-art...

2009-03-19 08:55:11

Caesium fountains are more accurate than "normal" atomic caesium clocks, because in fountains the caesium atoms are cooled down with the aid of laser beams and come ever slower - from a rapid velocity at room temperature to a slow "creep pace" of a few centimetres per second at a temperature close to the absolute zero point. Thus, the atoms remain together for a longer time so that the physicists have considerably more time to measure the decisive property of the caesium atoms which is...

2008-12-31 17:54:53

A British research scientist said a leap second would be tacked on to the end of 2008 to correct for eccentricities in the Earth's rotation. Peter Whibberley, a senior research scientist at Britain's National Physical Laboratory, said the world's official clock, the atomic Coordinated Universal Time, would recognize the extra second Wednesday night immediately before midnight, CNN reported. The difference between atomic time and Earth time has now built up to the point where it needs to be...

2008-12-24 16:47:08

This year will be longer than usual -- by one second, the U.S. Institute of Standards and Technology said Wednesday. The earth is sufficiently out of sync that a leap second has been scheduled for 7 p.m. U.S. Eastern Standard Time on Dec. 31, said the institute, noting those interested in watching it happen should go to www.time.gov before midnight, London time, and click on their time zone. A total of 24 leap seconds have been added since 1972, the last being in December 2005, because the...


Latest Second Reference Libraries

0_3c981185d3336687e1466aa007bb3157
2009-07-10 12:54:52

Cesium (or Caesium) is a chemical element with the symbol Cs and atomic number 55. Caesium is a soft alkali metal that is silvery-gold. It melts and liquefies at 83 degrees Fahrenheit and is one of only five metals that are liquid close to room temperature. Caesium is a metal that is most widely known for its use in atomic clocks. Cesium comes from the Latin word caesius meaning "˜bluish-gray'. It was discovered in 1860 by Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff in Durkheim, Germany in mineral...

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Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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