Quantcast

Latest Secretion Stories

Some Bacteria Attack Using Poison Daggers
2012-02-27 10:00:41

[ Watch the Video ] Bacteria have evolved different systems for secreting proteins into the fluid around them or into other cells. Some, for example, have syringe-like exterior structures that can pierce other cells and inject proteins. Another system, called a type VI secretion system, is found in about a quarter of all bacteria with two membranes. Despite being common, researchers have not understood how it works. Now a team, co-led by researchers at the California Institute of...

2012-02-10 11:37:39

Scientists from Queen Mary, University of London have discovered the workings behind some of the bacteria that kill hundreds of thousands every year, possibly paving the way for new antibiotics that could treat infections more effectively. With antibiotic resistance on the rise in strains of pathogenic bacteria, innovative strategies are needed to discover ways of treating bacterial infections in both humans and in agriculture. Writing in the journal PLoS Pathogens, the team from Queen...

2012-01-27 10:48:03

A team of biologists at the University of York has made an important advance in our understanding of the way cholera attacks the body. The discovery could help scientists target treatments for the globally significant intestinal disease which kills more than 100,000 people every year. The disease is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which is able to colonise the intestine usually after consumption of contaminated water or food. Once infection is established, the bacterium secretes a...

2012-01-26 12:02:07

Visualization of the molecular gateway across and into cellular membranes All living organisms are made up of cells, behind these intricate life forms lie complex cellular processes that allow our bodies to function. Researchers working on protein secretion – a fundamental process in biology – have revealed how protein channels in the membrane are activated by special signals contained in proteins destined for secretion. The results help explain the underlying mechanism...

2012-01-19 18:03:17

Findings could provide basis for first treatment for Shiga toxin infection Carnegie Mellon University researchers have discovered that an element commonly found in nature might provide a way to neutralize the potentially lethal effects of a compound known as Shiga toxin. New results published in the Jan. 20 issue of Science by Carnegie Mellon biologists Adam Linstedt and Somshuvra Mukhopadhyay show that manganese completely protects against Shiga toxicosis in animal models. Produced by...

2011-12-13 14:47:07

Single-celled bacteria communicate with each other using coded messages to coordinate attacks on their targets. Until now, the diversity of codes employed by these invading bacteria was thought to be extremely limited. However, a new report published Dec. 12 in PLoS ONE reveals bacterial communication by a novel, previously undescribed signal type — and, as is often the case in evolutionary stories, some plants have evolved a complementary cypher-breaking detection system that...

2011-12-09 11:51:09

A protein called enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays a central role in plants' ability to defend themselves from pathogens. But in the almost two decades since it was discovered, how EDS1 works at the molecular level has been a mystery. Solving the mystery will help scientists enhance disease resistance in crops. Two papers published in the Dec. 9 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/magazine) demonstrate how EDS1 activates different components of the plant immune system,...

2011-11-22 11:33:19

Implications for biofuels University of Georgia researchers have discovered that two proteins come together in an unexpected way to make a carbohydrate, a chain of sugar molecules, in plant cell walls. This fundamental discovery changes the way scientists think about how plant cell walls are made and opens a new door to converting plants to biofuels and other carbon-based products. In 2006, the UGA research team, led by Debra Mohnen, a faculty member in the UGA Complex Carbohydrate...


Latest Secretion Reference Libraries

45_d2fcb725ecc7dee8dbe887c765abd299
2011-04-14 14:17:06

Agrobacterium tumefaciens is the causal agent of crown gall disease (the formation of tumours) in over 140 species of dicot. It is rod shaped. Symptoms are caused by the insertion of a small segment of DNA into the plant cell. It is an alphaproteobacterium of the family Rhizobiaceae which includes the nitrogen fixing legume symbionts. They are pathogenic and provide no benefit to the plant. It also affects a wide variety of plants. In an economical sense it affects walnuts, grape vines,...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related