Quantcast

Latest Seismology Stories

106572272
2012-08-30 17:17:09

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists are reviving a century old Tesla experiment by trying to recreate an earthquake through laboratory means. Nikola Tesla tried recreating earthquakes with his electro-mechanical oscillator, or "earthquake machine," back in 1898. He attached the device to building structures in a laboratory on Houston Street in New York. According to legend, the machine shook not only his building, but neighboring structures, leading...

Want To Host A Seismograph In Your Home? Become A NetQuaker
2012-08-27 15:24:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online As this weekend's earthquakes still captivate the headlines, a new program is emerging that implores citizens to act as scientists to try and predict the next big quake. The program, called NetQuakes, is a crowdsourcing earthquake-monitoring program where ordinary people volunteer to help monitor quakes. The grassroots movement uses volunteers to act as hosts for one of the program's blue seismometers. NetQuake is an effort...

earthquake 001
2012-08-27 09:00:01

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online UPDATE : 08-27-2012 10:00 a.m. (EST) Latest reports on the swarm of Southern California earthquakes puts the number at somewhere around 300, according to the USGS. The continuing series of temblors produced only minor damage, knocking trailers off their foundations and breaking windows. A few reports of cosmetic damage has also been reported on some older buildings. Most of the quakes were in the range of magnitude of 3.0,...

shutterstock_95177818
2012-08-24 19:26:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Glaciologists from Pennsylvania State University and Washington University said their recent study on the David Glacier that appeared in Nature Geoscience not only provides a window into the behavior of glaciers–it also could be used as a simple model for the mechanism behind slip-stick earthquakes like those that occur in Haiti or along the San Andreas Fault. From 2002 to 2003, the research team recorded over 20,000...

Arizona Earthquakes Not As Rare As Once Thought
2012-08-15 08:40:27

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earthquakes are a scary phenomenon. They are enormously destructive and much more common than you might think. Several million earthquakes are estimated to occur worldwide each year. Most are too small to feel, but they can be measured by arrays of seismometers. Some are so large they claim hundreds of thousands of lives (Shaanxi China, 1556, claimed 830,000 lives) while some create massive economic hardship (San Francisco, USA,...

2012-08-08 22:23:46

A team of researchers may have discovered a way to hear earthquakes. Not the noises of rattling windows and crumbling buildings, but the real sounds an earthquake makes deep underground as rock grinds and fails catastrophically. Typical seismic waves have frequencies below the audible range for humans, but the August issue of EARTH shows you where to find the voice of one seismic monster: the March 11, 2011, magnitude-9.0 Tohoku earthquake in Japan. Beyond the novelty of simply hearing an...

2012-08-03 01:18:30

The press release and paper noted below, publishing in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, is strictly under embargo until 12:00 Noon Eastern Time US on August 2, 2012. The past decade has been plagued with what seems to be a cluster of large earthquakes, with massive quakes striking Sumatra, Chile, Haiti and Japan since 2004. Some researchers have suggested that this cluster has occurred because the earthquakes may be "communicating" across large distances, possibly...

2012-08-03 01:17:03

Changes in seismic velocity--changes in the speeds at which seismic waves move through the Earth's crust--have been identified during and after many earthquakes. But do these changes also happen before an earthquake, and could they be measured as a way to predict a quake on the way? The search for a clear and measurable pre-quake signal has been called "the holy grail of seismology." In a new analysis of the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake in California, David Schaff suggests some...

Iapetus Ice Avalanches Explain Landslides Elsewhere
2012-07-30 04:26:15

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri have found that giant ice avalanches on Saturn's moon Iapetus could provide clues to slippage in other places in the Solar System. Kelsi Singer, graduate student in Earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at the university, says that landslides take place everywhere in the Solar System, but Iapetus has more giant landslides than any celestial body in our...

New Evidence For Regular Magnitude 8 Earthquakes On Alpin Fault
2012-07-27 13:21:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The most dangerous fault line on the island of New Zealand is the Alpine Fault. It is approximately 80 miles northwest of the islands main city of Christchurch. Research published in the prestigious journal Science, co-authored by University of Nevada, Reno's Glenn Biasi and colleagues at GNS Science in New Zealand, shows that very large earthquakes have been occurring regularly on the Alpine Fault along the southwest coastline of...


Latest Seismology Reference Libraries

Seismology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes and the spread of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis in addition to diverse seismic sources such as tectonic, volcanic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes. A related field that utilizes geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is a seismogram. A...

0_5badd37024d78e3386e67ababbfe35a0
2010-11-15 18:30:29

The Richter scale assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. The scale uses a base-10 logarithm by calculating the logarithm of the combined horizontal amplitude of the largest displacement from zero on a particular type of seismometer. A earthquake measuring 5.0 on the Richter scale has a shaking amplitude 10 times larger than one that measures 4.0. The moment magnitude, calibrated to give generally similar value for medium-sized...

0_2d32b95d634235dd48b1f1b3e5949a2e
2010-10-07 16:05:32

The Seismometer is an instrument designed to measure the motions of the ground. This includes seismic waves generated by earthquakes, nuclear explosions, and other seismic sources. Records of these activities allow seismologists to map the interior of the Earth, and locate and measure the size of the different sources. There are also seismographs, which is sometimes used in place of the word seismometer. However, a seismograph is the older instrument in which the measuring and recording...

More Articles (3 articles) »
Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.