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Latest Selection Stories

2012-01-09 13:17:11

Females influence the gender of their offspring so they inherit either their mother's or grandfather's qualities. 'High-quality' females — those which produce more offspring — are more likely to have daughters. Weaker females, whose own fathers were stronger and more successful, produce more sons. The study, by scientists at the University of Exeter (UK), Okayama University and Kyushu University (Japan), is published today (9 January) in the journal Ecology Letters. It shows...

2011-12-01 22:34:42

News tips from the December issue of the American Naturalist Article Highlights from the December issue of The American Naturalist:     Columbia River Salmon are Adapting to Climate Change     Predators Keep Local Frogs In Uniform     Can sexual selection's bizarre creations sometimes set evolution on a path to novel survival strategies? For the complete table of contents for the December issue, go to www.journals.uchicago.edu/an....

2011-11-09 16:11:25

In the fight for survival, plants are capable of complex social behaviours and may exhibit altruism towards family members, but aggressively compete with strangers. A growing body of work suggests plants recognize and respond to the presence and identity of their neighbours. But can plants cooperate with their relatives? While some studies have shown that siblings perform best -- suggesting altruism towards relatives -- other studies have shown that when less related plants grow together...

2011-10-13 18:35:50

Grim economic times could cause men to seek more sexual partners, giving them more chances to reproduce, according to research by Omri Gillath, a social psychology professor at the University of Kansas. Men are likely to pursue short-term mating strategies when faced with a threatening environment, according to sexual selection theory based on evolutionary psychology. When made to think about their own death, which mimics conditions of "low survivability," Gillath and his colleagues...

2011-06-15 16:30:00

CHANHASSEN, Minn., June 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The entrepreneurial spirit around the country is about to 'warm-up' and hit the gym. Peter Taunton, Founder and CEO of Snap Fitness, the world's fastest-growing franchisor of 24/7 express fitness centers, announces the launch of his "Partner with Peter" contest that will award one aspiring entrepreneur a free fitness franchise. Kicking-off June 15, 2011, contestants visiting www.petertaunton.com can enter to win by providing their contact...

2011-06-10 12:26:22

The origins of rice have been cast in a new light by research publishing in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics on June 9, 2011. By reconciling two theories, the authors show that the domestication of rice occurred at least twice independently but with extensive "borrowing" between the two subspecies. Indica and japonica are, respectively, the southern and northern varieties of rice and they are major staple crops in Asia. Whether they share a single origin of domestication or were...

2011-05-27 13:37:04

How females select their sexual partners is a matter of more than passing concern to a large number of males.  Focus has gradually switched from the idea that certain males are the most attractive or the best and researchers are increasingly considering the idea that particular individuals might be intrinsically compatible.  Dating agencies routinely include questions about potential partners' hobbies and interests.  Such issues are clearly important but the latest results from...

2011-05-04 12:44:59

Using simple robots to simulate genetic evolution over hundreds of generations, Swiss scientists provide quantitative proof of kin selection and shed light on one of the most enduring puzzles in biology: Why do most social animals, including humans, go out of their way to help each other? In next week's issue of the online, open access journal PLoS Biology, EPFL robotics professor Dario Floreano teams up with University of Lausanne biologist Laurent Keller to weigh in on the oft-debated...

2011-04-07 13:57:24

Female deer do not always choose the bigger and dominant males to mate with, scientists from Queen Mary, University of London and Hartpury College have found. The research, which was undertaken in Dublin's Phoenix Park on a herd of fallow deer, focussed on females who chose not to mate with the 'top' males. The study, published today (6 April) in PLoS ONE found that yearling females tended to mate with a higher proportion of younger, lower ranking males while older females actively avoided...

2011-03-07 21:57:51

For the vast majority of plants and animals, the 'bigger is better' view of evolution may not be far off the mark, says a new broad-scale study of natural selection. Organisms with bigger bodies or faster growth rates tend to live longer, mate more and produce more offspring, whether they are deer or damselflies, the authors report. Researchers working at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center compiled and reviewed nearly 150 published estimates of natural selection, representing more...


Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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