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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 17:34 EDT

Latest Self control Stories

2010-02-11 14:23:14

Type-2 diabetes, an increasingly common complication of obesity, is associated with poor impulse control. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal BioPsychoSocial Medicine suggest that neurological changes result in this inability to resist temptation, which may in turn exacerbate diabetes. Hiroaki Kumano, from Waseda University, Japan, worked with a team of researchers to assess response inhibition, a measure of self-control, in 27 patients with type-2 diabetes and 27...

2010-01-14 17:34:29

Before patting yourself on the back for resisting that cookie or kicking yourself for giving in to temptation, look around. A new University of Georgia study has revealed that self-control"”or the lack thereof"”is contagious. In a just-published series of studies involving hundreds of volunteers, researchers have found that watching or even thinking about someone with good self-control makes others more likely exert self-control. The researchers found that the opposite holds, too,...

2009-10-14 11:24:51

If you think choosing between a candy bar and healthy snack is totally a matter of free will, think again. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that the choices we make to indulge ourselves or exercise self-control depend on how the choices are presented. Author Juliano Laran (University of Miami) tested subjects to determine how certain words and concepts affected consumers' decisions for self-control or indulgence. He found that consumer choices were affected by the actions...

2009-08-06 21:39:30

People say they have more restraint than they actually possess -- leading to poor decisions when tempted with greed, lust or drugs, U.S. researchers said. Study leader Loran Nordgren of the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Ill., examined how an individual's belief in his or her ability to control impulses -- such as greed, drug craving and sexual arousal -- influence responses to temptation. People are not good at anticipating the power of their urges, and those who are the most...

2009-08-03 12:35:00

Whether it's highlighted in major news headlines about Argentinean affairs and Ponzi schemes, or in personal battles with obesity and drug addiction, individuals regularly succumb to greed, lust and self-destructive behaviors. New research from the Kellogg School of Management examines why this is the case, and demonstrates that individuals believe they have more restraint than they actually possess"”ultimately leading to poor decision-making.The study, led by Loran Nordgren, senior...

2009-07-10 06:40:00

MANSFIELD, Conn., July 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Life is unfair, the economy is out of control and disaster can strike at any time. However true these statements might be, your ability to bounce back from your circumstances depends on your own control over yourself. In his refreshing new self-help book, "Controlling Your Future: Six Steps To A Better Life" (published by AuthorHouse), Richard Norgaard shows readers how to achieve total fitness -- mind, body and finances -- through self-discipline and...

2009-05-01 09:00:01

When you're on a diet, deciding to skip your favorite calorie-laden foods and eat something healthier takes a whole lot of self-control--an ability that seems to come easier to some of us than others. Now, scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have uncovered differences in the brains of people who are able to exercise self-control versus those who find it almost impossible.The key? While everyone uses the same single area of the brain to make these sorts of...

2009-04-07 09:25:48

Exerting self-control is exhausting. In fact, using self-control in one situation impairs our ability to use self-control in subsequent, even unrelated, situations. What about thinking of other people exerting self-control? Earlier research has shown that imagining actions can cause the same reactions as if we were actually performing them (e.g., simulating eating a disgusting food results in a revolting face, even if no food has been eaten) and psychologists Joshua M. Ackerman and John A....

2009-02-09 14:41:12

The reason teens are prone to risky decision-making has less to do with impulse and more to do with a desire do something exciting, U.S. researchers suggest. Scientists at Temple University, the University of California, Los Angeles, Georgetown University, the University of California, Irvine, and the University of Colorado, looked at more than 900 individuals ranging in age from age 10-30 and from a diverse ethnic and socioeconomic group to determine how people of different ages think about...

2009-01-01 23:48:22

Religious people have more self-control than their less religious counterparts do, a University of Miami professor has concluded. Michael McCullough said the findings imply that religious people may be better at pursuing and achieving long-term goals that are important to them and their religious groups. This, in turn, might help explain why religious people tend to have lower rates of substance abuse, better school achievement, less delinquency, better health behaviors, less depression and...