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Latest Sense Stories

2013-12-09 14:07:38

We each live in a unique odor world According to Gertrude Stein, "A rose is a rose is a rose," but new research indicates that might not be the case when it comes to the rose's scent. Researchers from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions have found that as much as 30 percent of the large array of human olfactory receptor differs between any two individuals. This substantial variation is in turn reflected by variability in how each person perceives odors. Humans have about...

2013-11-11 11:09:02

A study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine shines a new light on molecular tools our cells use to govern regulated gene expression. The study was published on line in advance of print November 10 in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology. "We uncovered a novel mechanism that allows proteins that direct pre-mRNA splicing – RNA-binding proteins – to induce a regulatory effect from greater distances than was thought possible,"...

Understanding How You See In The Dark
2013-10-31 09:00:19

University of Rochester Most people can see their body's movement in the absence of light Find a space with total darkness and slowly move your hand from side to side in front of your face. What do you see? If the answer is a shadowy shape moving past, you are probably not imagining things. With the help of computerized eye trackers, a new cognitive science study finds that at least 50 percent of people can see the movement of their own hand even in the absence of all light....

2013-10-21 13:38:31

Think of the smell of an orange, a lemon, and a grapefruit. Each has strong acidic notes mixed with sweetness. And yet each fresh, bright scent is distinguishable from its relatives. These fruits smell similar because they share many chemical compounds. How, then does the brain tell them apart? How does the brain remember a complex and often overlapping chemical signature as a particular scent? Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) are using the fruit fly to discover how the...

Making Prosthetic Limbs More Touch Sensitive
2013-10-15 04:35:49

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Chicago are laying the foundation for prosthetic limbs that could one day convey real-time touch-related data to amputees through a direct interface with the brain. The blueprint for these touch-sensitive prosthetic limbs, which has been published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, represents a vital advancement towards new technology that could increase the...

DEET Alternatives Of The Future
2013-10-03 04:27:36

[ Watch the Video: UC Riverside Research Team Identifies DEET Receptors ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In research that could lead to the development of a safer alternative to the DEET, scientists from the University of California, Riverside have discovered the olfactory receptors used by insects to sense the repellant. While experts have long known that bugs are repelled by DEET (also known as N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), UC-Riverside associate professor of...

Spinning Doesn't Dizzy Ballerinas Due To Brain Conditioning
2013-09-27 13:46:12

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Spinning around in circles causes dizziness in most people, which could be a problem for figure skaters or ballerinas who must perform several spins during a typical routine. However, new research in the journal Cerebral Cortex indicates that ballerinas may have conditioned their brain to better handle a series of quick spins. Study researchers said their findings could be used to improve treatments for patients with chronic dizziness....


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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