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Latest Sensory receptor Stories

Odor Receptors Found In Lungs
2014-01-03 10:22:27

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology has revealed that odor receptors aren’t just found in the nose – they also line the lungs as well. However, instead of being used to detect the aroma of blueberry cobbler or a succulent roasting chicken, the odor receptors in the lungs trigger a response designed to protect the airways. “We forget,” said study author Yehuda Ben-Shahar,...

Lab Rats Can Fine-tune Their Sense Of Smell
2012-10-31 11:23:10

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study by University of Chicago researchers showed that some animals are able to focus their sense of smell in much the same way that humans can focus their vision. According to the study that was published in the current issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, the researchers found that laboratory rats were able to adjust their sense of smell by altering their sniffing, which brought scents to receptors in different parts of their...

2012-03-12 19:52:43

Animals live in surprisingly different sensory worlds Scientists from the Monell Center report that seven of 12 related mammalian species have lost the sense of sweet taste. As each of the sweet-blind species eats only meat, the findings demonstrate that a liking for sweets is frequently lost during the evolution of diet specialization. Previous research from the Monell team had revealed the remarkable finding that both domestic and wild cats are unable to taste sweet compounds due to...

2011-12-05 13:02:56

Fruit fly and malaria mosquito sensors attuned to heat, chemical odors Fruit flies and mosquitoes share similar sensory receptors that allow them to distinguish among thousands of sensory cues — particularly heat and chemical odors — as they search for food or try to avoid danger, researchers from Boston College and Brandeis University report in the current electronic edition of the journal Nature. Pinpointing a tiny portion of a protein found on the surfaces of neurons that...

2010-05-27 17:26:53

Researchers have discovered a chemical that specifically blocks people's ability to detect the bitter aftertaste that comes with artificial sweeteners such as saccharin. The key is a molecule known only as GIV3727 that specifically targets and inhibits a handful of human bitter taste receptors, according to a report published online on May 27th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The finding of what the researchers say is the first commercially relevant small-molecule bitter taste...

2010-04-21 06:34:21

What does the smell of a good meal mean to you? It may mean more than you think. Specific odors that represent food or indicate danger are capable of altering an animal's lifespan and physiological profile by activating a small number of highly specialized sensory neurons, researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Houston, and Baylor College of Medicine have shown in a study publishing next week in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology. Recent research in model organisms...

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2010-03-15 14:30:00

Scientists reported on Sunday that some snakes can detect the faint body heat from prey three feet away with enough precision and speed to hunt in the dark. Scientists have known for decades that rattlesnakes, boas and pythons have pit organs between their eye and nostril to sense infrared radiation in their environment. The western diamondback rattlesnake is in a league of its own by having the ability to heat-seek up to 10 times more precisely than any of its relatives. The snake has...

2009-06-30 09:52:58

Many plants protect themselves from hungry animals by producing toxic chemicals. In turn, animals rely on detecting the presence of these harmful chemicals to avoid consuming dangerous plant material. A paper, published in this week's issue of PLoS Biology, investigates the response of an insect to a common plant weapon "“ the toxin L-canavanine. The work, from authors at the Institute of Functional Genomic of Montpellier, finds that the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster can recognize...

2005-07-12 01:45:00

Johns Hopkins scientists have uncovered new details of how smelly things create signals in the nose that eventually go to the brain. The findings raise issues about how the process involved has been described for many years in biology textbooks. The textbooks say that our sense of smell converts odors into brain signals just like our vision converts light into brain signals. But the new work shows that while a key protein pathway is used in both, it behaves quite differently in the nose than...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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