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Latest Sensory receptor Stories

Odor Receptors Found In Lungs
2014-01-03 10:22:27

New research has revealed that odor receptors aren’t just found in the nose – they also line the lungs as well.

Lab Rats Can Fine-tune Their Sense Of Smell
2012-10-31 11:23:10

A new study by University of Chicago researchers showed that some animals are able to focus their sense of smell in much the same way that humans can focus their vision.

2012-03-12 19:52:43

Scientists from the Monell Center report that seven of 12 related mammalian species have lost the sense of sweet taste.

2011-12-05 13:02:56

Fruit flies and mosquitoes share similar sensory receptors that allow them to distinguish among thousands of sensory cues – particularly heat and chemical odors – as they search for food or try to avoid danger.

2010-05-27 17:26:53

Researchers have discovered a chemical that specifically blocks people's ability to detect the bitter aftertaste that comes with artificial sweeteners such as saccharin.

2010-04-21 06:34:21

Specific odors that represent food or indicate danger are capable of altering an animal's lifespan and physiological profile by activating a small number of highly specialized sensory neurons.

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2010-03-15 14:30:00

Scientists reported on Sunday that some snakes can detect the faint body heat from prey three feet away with enough precision and speed to hunt in the dark.

2009-06-30 09:52:58

Many plants protect themselves from hungry animals by producing toxic chemicals. In turn, animals rely on detecting the presence of these harmful chemicals to avoid consuming dangerous plant material.

2005-07-12 01:45:00

Johns Hopkins scientists have uncovered new details of how smelly things create signals in the nose that eventually go to the brain. The findings raise issues about how the process involved has been described for many years in biology textbooks.


Word of the Day
pawl
  • A pivoted catch designed to fall into a notch on a ratchet wheel so as to allow movement in only one direction (e.g. on a windlass or in a clock mechanism), or alternatively to move the wheel in one direction.
The word 'pawl' probably comes from a Latin word meaning 'stake'.
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