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Latest Sensory substitution Stories

Colors And Shapes Can Be Heard By The Blind: Study
2014-03-11 06:52:16

[ Watch the Video: EyeMusic Live Demo at AIPAC ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Normally, people perceive colors and shapes visually, but what if you could "hear" them? A new study from Hebrew University shows that using sensory substitution devices (SSDs), colors and shapes can now be conveyed to the brain noninvasively through other senses. Prof. Amir Amedi, of the Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences and the Institute for Medical Research...

Seeing With Your Ears
2013-07-09 05:51:30

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new device that trains the brain to convert sounds into images could someday be used as a non-invasive treatment for blind and partially sighted people, according to researchers at the University of Bath. Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) aim to compensate for the loss of a sensory modality, typically vision, by converting information from the lost modality into stimuli in a remaining modality. The device in the current...

2012-12-12 23:22:01

When you walk into a darkened room, your first instinct is to feel around for a light switch. You slide your hand along the wall, feeling the transition from the doorframe to the painted drywall, and then up and down until you find the metal or plastic plate of the switch. During the process you use your sense of touch to develop an image in your mind of the wall´s surface and make a better guess for where the switch is. Sliman Bensmaia, PhD, assistant professor of organismal biology...

New Sound Device Teaches Blind People To See
2012-11-08 08:57:31

[WATCH VIDEO: Examples of Visual Stimuli Used in SSD Training] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has been long believed that blindness in early infanthood makes sight restoration later in life next to impossible as the brain´s visual cortex has been deprived of visual information. But some researchers have shown that blind people, even those with lifelong blindness, can learn to process visual input using sound. Working from the Hebrew University of...

The Visually Impaired Reach For Objects In Space Using Device That Converts Images Into Music
2012-07-05 12:07:20

Research results reported in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) use sound or touch to help the visually impaired perceive the visual scene surrounding them. The ideal SSD would assist not only in sensing the environment but also in performing daily activities based on this input. For example, accurately reaching for a coffee cup, or shaking a friend's hand. In a new study, scientists trained blindfolded sighted participants to perform fast and...

2012-05-16 21:12:49

A method developed at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for training blind persons to "see" through the use of a sensory substitution device (SSD) has enabled those using the system to actually "read" an eye chart with letter sizes smaller than those used in determining the international standard for blindness. The eight congenitally blind participants in the Hebrew University test group passed the conventional eye-exam of the Snellen acuity test, technically surpassing the world-agreed...

e4dbaca401fc0bf7f6b70377cec4b553
2011-05-20 11:05:00

"Perhaps when we get hurt, we should not only "Ëœrub it better' but also cross our arms," said Dr. Giandomenico Iannetti, the lead author of a study at the University College London. The study, published in the journal PAIN, details how scientists used a laser to generate a four millisecond pin prick of "pure pain" "“ which is pain without touch "“ on the hands of a small group of eight participants, which was repeated with the arms crossed over the midline "“ an...

2011-05-11 01:02:54

The part of the brain that uses hearing to determine sound location is reorganized in deaf animals to locate visual targets, according to a new study by a team of researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Western Ontario in Canada. These findings propose a new theory for cross-modal plasticity: loss of one sensory modality is substituted by another while maintaining the original function of the brain region. It is known that persons who have suffered major...

2010-10-29 09:41:43

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The brain can process sensory information in a fraction of a second, but in special cases it can be processed quicker.  A recent study from the Journal of Neuroscience found that those who are born blind can process tactile signals quicker than those with unimpaired vision. Daniel Goldreich, PhD and his research team at McMaster University tested the tactile aptitude of 89 non-blind subjects against 57 vision-impaired subjects by tapping each individual's index...

2010-10-07 13:29:05

Finding explains why the blind can hear and feel with greater acuity than the sighted can People who have been blind from birth make use of the visual parts of their brain to refine their sensation of sound and touch, according to an international team of researchers led by neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC). Published today in the journal Neuron, the scientists say this finding helps explain why the blind have such advanced perception of these senses "“...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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