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Latest Sexual conflict Stories

2012-04-26 09:47:47

Male praying mantises are more likely to engage in risky mating behavior if they have not had recent access to females, as reported Apr. 25 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. Female praying mantises are known for their cannibalistic behavior toward their mates, and males take a large risk when they attempt to reproduce. In the current work, led by William Brown of State University of New York at Fredonia, the researchers found that males modulate this risk by altering their approach rate...

Bonobos‘ Unusual Success Story
2012-01-24 04:00:24

Dominant males invest in friendly relationships with females Mate competition by males over females is common in many animal species. During mating season male testosterone levels rise, resulting in an increase in aggressive behavior and masculine features. Male bonobos, however, invest much more into friendly relationships with females. Elevated testosterone and aggression levels would collide with this increased tendency towards forming pair-relationships. Bonobos are among the...

2011-05-16 15:59:15

Aggressive male mating behavior might well be a successful reproductive strategy for the individual but it can drive the species to extinction, an international research team headed by evolutionary biologist Daniel Rankin from the University of Zurich has demonstrated in a mathematical model. Evolutionary biologists have long debated whether the behavior of the individual is able to influence processes on a population or species level. The possibility of selection at species level is still...

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2010-11-05 09:28:17

A new study published this week shows a genetic 'battle of the sexes' could be much harder to resolve and even more important to evolution than previously thought. This battle, observed across many species and known as intralocus sexual conflict, happens when the genes for a trait which is good for the breeding success of one sex are bad for the other "“ sparking an 'evolutionary tug-o-war' between the sexes. It has previously been thought these issues were only resolved when the trait...

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2010-09-13 09:20:17

Sexual conflict is not only a human phenomenon. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg have shown that females of the rough periwinkle conceal their gender identity in order to avoid excessive copulation. The females of most species of snail excrete a substance in their mucous trails that enables males to find them more easily, since they can distinguish between trails from females and those from other males. The males follow the mucous trails laid down by females in order to find a...

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2010-04-05 07:49:32

Mothers win the genetic tug of war by producing more sons with larger fathers and more daughters with smaller fathers "Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies." Mother Teresa's words echo throughout the world. They ring particularly true in the biological kingdom among brown anole lizards, as evidenced in research detailed in the April 2 edition of the journal Science. Dartmouth researchers Ryan Calsbeek and Bob Cox study male and female brown anole lizards...

2009-12-23 16:01:09

Female ducks have evolved an intriguing way to avoid becoming impregnated by undesirable but aggressive males endowed with large corkscrew-shaped penises: vaginas with clockwise spirals that thwart oppositely spiraled males. More details of this evolutionary battle of the sexes fought at the level of genitalia are described by Yale researchers in the December 23 issue of the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. "In species where forced copulation is common, males have evolved longer...

2009-10-22 14:53:58

The great diversity of male sexual traits, ranging from peacock's elaborate train to formidable genitalia of male seed beetles, is the result of female choice. But why do females choose among males? In a new study published today in Current Biology, researchers from Uppsala University found no support for the theory that the female choice is connected to "good genes". The great diversity of male sexual traits, ranging from peacock's elaborate train to formidable genitalia of male seed...

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2007-05-10 06:00:00

By Roughgarden, Joan May a biologist in these polarized times dare suggest that Darwin is a bit wrong about anything? Even worse, does a biologist risk insult, ridicule, anger, and intimidation to suggest that Darwin is incorrect on a big issue? We have a test case before us. Darwin appears completely mistaken in his theory of sex roles, a subject called the 'theory of sexual selection.'1 In his 1871 book The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, Darwin wrote : "Males of almost...

2005-06-20 22:35:30

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. -- This summer, in a darkened meadow west of Boston, Tufts University biologists are continuing to shine new light on the frenzied love life of fireflies. For the first time, researchers will explore the question of whether male fireflies' flashing light "“ previously shown in one species to indicate superior physical and genetic quality "“ has evolved in another species to provide misinformation to prospective mates. In other words, are some male...


Latest Sexual conflict Reference Libraries

Stegodyphus lineatus
2014-04-07 14:12:35

Stegodyphus lineatus is the only European species belonging to the spider genus Stegodyphus. The males of this species are up to 12 millimeters long, while the females are up to 15 millimeters long. The coloration can range from whitish to almost black. In the majority of individuals, the opisthosoma is whitish with two broad black longitudinal stripes. The males and females look similar, but the male is usually richer in contrast and has a bulbous forehead. The species name is in...

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Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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