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Latest Sexual dimorphism Stories

2013-02-20 10:26:29

Findings could lead to greater understanding of sex differences in language acquisition Male rat pups have more of a specific brain protein associated with language development than females, according to a study published February 20 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The study also found sex differences in the brain protein in a small group of children. The findings may shed light on sex differences in communication in animals and language acquisition in people. Sex differences in early...

Determining Sexual Selection In Extinct Species
2013-01-30 08:11:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a new study in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, determining if certain extinct animals had sexually selective traits is possible, despite the fact that we cannot observe their behavior. Many animals have sexually selective traits that are used or displayed in pursuit of a mate, male peacocks have their colorful plumage and mallard ducks have a distinct green coloration to their head feathers. Some of these...

Aggression And Face Shape Not Linked
2013-01-26 06:32:55

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international research group, led by the University of Barcelona, has found there is no evidence to support the association between facial shape and aggression in men. The study, published in a recent issue of PLOS ONE, sampled almost 5,000 individuals from 94 worldwide populations. The team, which includes Rolando González José, from the Patagonic National Centre (CENPAT-CONICET) and Jorge...

Zebrafish Perform Colorful Courtship Displays
2012-11-30 14:58:35

University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna Billy Ocean may not have been thinking of fish when he wrote “The Color of Love”, but Sophie Hutter, Attila Hettyey, Dustin Penn, and Sarah Zala from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna were able to show that zebrafish males and females both wear their brightest colors while wooing a mate. Elaborate secondary sexual displays are often overlooked because many species attract mates...

Biologists Turn Back The Clock To Understand Evolution Of Sex Differences
2012-05-03 12:44:23

Battles of sexes shown to spur adaptive sex differences Sex differences account for some of the most of the spectacular traits in nature: the wild colors of male guppies, the plumage of peacocks, tusks on walruses and antlers on moose. Sexual conflict — the battle between males and females over mating — is thought to be a particularly potent force in driving the evolution traits that differ in males and females. However, the genetic processes responsible for producing such...

2012-02-03 09:00:00

Men and women may be equals, but they often behave differently when it comes to sex and parenting. Now a study of the differences between the brains of male and female mice in the February 3rd issue of the Cell Press journal Cell provides insight into how our own brains might be programmed for these stereotypically different behaviors. The new evidence shows that the sex hormones — testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone — act in a key region of the brain, switching certain...

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2011-02-08 11:07:58

Up until now it was unknown whether males of the great bustard (Otis tarda), an emblematic bird in Spain and endangered at a global level, transmit information on their weight, size, and age through their plumage. For the first time a study shows that the 'beards' and the design of the neck are "reliable" indicators of the weight and age of their bearers, and are used to both avoid fights with competitors and to attract females. "The heaviest males (best physical condition) make it known to...

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2010-08-03 09:39:51

It's a question that has puzzled scientists for years: why, in some species of spiders, are the females so much larger than their male counterparts? Now, investigators from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) believe they have found the answer. According to their findings, which are published in Wednesday's edition of the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, the cause is likely tied to bridging, a technique of transportation used by some spiders to cross large gaps. When...

2010-05-14 09:42:46

Male physical competition, not attraction, was central in winning mates among human ancestors, according to a Penn State anthropologist. "There is sexual competition in many species, including humans," said David A. Puts, assistant professor of biological anthropology. Many researchers have considered mate choice the main operator in human sexual selection. They thought that people's mating success was mainly determined by attractiveness; but for men, it appears that physical competition...

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2010-03-11 14:47:10

In most animal species, males and females show obvious differences in body size. But how can this be, given that both sexes share the same genes governing their growth? University of Arizona entomologists studied this conundrum in moths and found clues that had been overlooked by previous efforts to explain this mystery of nature. Take a look around in the animal world and you will find that, in most organisms, individuals of one sex are larger than the other of the species. Even though...


Latest Sexual dimorphism Reference Libraries

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2009-02-27 16:03:37

The Greater Painted Snipe (Rostratula benghalensis) is a species of wading bird found in the marshes of Africa, India and southeast Asia (Sulawesi). Its preferred habitat are fringes of reed beds along shorelines of marshes, swamps, ponds and streams. The Greater Painted Snipe is not related to true snipes, and differs in habits, flight and appearance. This is a medium-sized bird with a long reddish-brown bill that is slightly downward curved at the tip. It has a unique white or pink eye...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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