Quantcast

Latest Sexual selection Stories

2014-07-29 23:02:29

In a new study, researchers mated worms of different species and found that the females’ lifespans and number of offspring were drastically reduced compared with females mated with the same species, and cross-species-mated females were often sterile. The researchers showed that the “foreign” sperm had broken from the female’s uterus, prematurely fertilized the eggs and destroyed the ovaries (causing no viable offspring and sterility), and traveled throughout the worm’s body...

Biologists Link Placenta Formation And Sexual Selection
2014-07-10 03:56:12

By Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California - Riverside UC Riverside research shows fish with placentas are smaller and less brightly colored than non-placental fish Sexual selection refers to species' selection for traits that are attractive to the opposite sex. This special type of natural selection enhances opportunities to mate, the tail of male peacocks being an iconic example. Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have now found that sexual selection and...

2014-04-30 11:57:57

It's official (in the horned beetle world at least), females prefer courtship over competitiveness – and it doesn't matter about the size of your mandibles either. An international study by scientists at the University of Exeter and the Universities of Okayama and Tsukuba in Japan investigated the complicated sexual conflict over mating in Gnatocerus cornutus, the horned flour-beetle. Female mate choice and male-male competition are the typical mechanisms of sexual selection. However,...

Sexual Conflict Affects Females More Than Males, At Least For Beetles
2014-04-29 17:03:55

University of Exeter Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that sexual conflict over mating impacts the parental care behavior and reproductive productivity of burying beetles. These beetles have surprisingly complex parental care, similar in form to that provided by birds such as robins or blackbirds, with offspring begging to be fed by touching parents, who respond by regurgitating partially digested food. Both males and females provide parental care, but females are...

It's Not All Sexual Selection
2014-03-05 14:54:45

University of Maryland Baltimore County Since the days of Darwin, scientists have considered bird song to be an exclusively male trait, resulting from sexual selection. Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the University of Melbourne in Australia, Leiden University in the Netherlands and The Australian National University says that's not the whole story. The team used information from several sources, including the Handbook of the Birds of...

Seal Evolution Discovery And Sexual Dimorphism
2014-02-20 08:20:42

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Pinning down the answer to a widely-asked question is one of the most exciting things a researcher can do. For Thomas Cullen, who completed the research as part of his Master's degree at Carleton University, this experience came early in his career. Cullen, working with Canadian Museum of Nature paleontologist Dr. Natalia Rybczynski, made a ground-breaking discovery about pinnipeds — the suborder that makes up seals, sea lions, and...

Infidelity Linked To Large Testicles
2014-01-29 10:15:23

Yngve Vogt  - University of Oslo “We can be grateful to parasites, bacteria and viruses for our ability to have sex. Even though sexual reproduction is far less efficient than non-sexual, nearly all living organisms that you can observe in your environment are based on sexual reproduction. The most important function of sex is to reshuffle the genes in each mating. In this way, the immune system develops resistance to parasites, bacteria and viruses,” explains Petter Bøckman,...

Flies That Live With Their Brothers Are Gentler Lovers
2014-01-23 13:39:47

University of Oxford Flies living with their brothers cause less harm to females during courting than those living with unrelated flies, say Oxford University scientists. The study, published this week in Nature, found that unrelated male flies compete more fiercely for females' attention than related flies, resulting in shorter lifespans for males and reduced fecundity for females. "In large populations brothers don't need to compete so much with each other for female attention...

Detailing The Evolution Of Plumage Patterns In Male, Female Birds
2013-12-19 14:06:31

Gerard LeBlond for redorbit.com - Your Universe Online Waterfowl such as ducks, geese and swans belong to the order Anseriformes. Game birds such as pheasants, partridges, hens and turkeys are known as the order Galliformes. The birds belonging to both of these orders are recognized not only for their meat, but also for the elegant display of their plumage. Some members within the orders show differences between male and female, known as sexual dimorphism. Such as with the mallard, the...

Study Shows Impact Of Polyandry On Reproductive Success In Fire Salamanders
2013-12-02 16:11:27

University of Bielefeld Researchers at Bielefeld University and the Technische Universität Braunschweig are the first to confirm the benefit of multiple paternities for a vertebrate under completely natural conditions. Together with their team, Dr. Barbara Caspers and Dr. Sebastian Steinfartz have shown that female fire salamanders mate with several males under natural conditions (so-called polyandry). This grants them fitness-relevant benefits by increasing their number of offspring. The...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'