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Latest Sexual selection Stories

Better Sex In Return For Nuptial Gifts
2013-10-24 13:41:15

[ Watch The Video: Male Spider Presents Gift Before Sex] Aarhus University A male spider that gives its selected female a nuptial gift is allowed to mate with her for a longer period of time and provide more sperm than a male that fails to come with a gift. If a male spider goes to the trouble of finding a good gift, wraps it up nicely in spider silk and offers it to a female he would like to mate, he has far better chances of fathering her offspring than if he skipped the present....

Role Of Sperm Competition In Formation Of New Species Confirmed By Biologists
2013-09-27 08:09:16

Syracuse University 'Current Biology' article marks culmination of 6 years of research Female promiscuity—something that occurs in a majority of species, including humans—results in the ejaculates from two or more males overlapping within her reproductive tract. When this happens, sperm compete for fertilization of the female's eggs. In addition, the female has the opportunity to bias fertilization of her eggs in favor of one male's sperm over others. These processes,...

2013-09-19 13:14:21

It is common for parents to influence mate choice — from arranged marriages to more subtle forms of persuasion — but they often disagree with their children about what makes a suitable partner. A new study has found an evolutionary explanation for why some parents try to control who their children pair up with. The study, involving a University of Bristol researcher and published today in the journal Evolution & Human Behavior, shows that this conflict over mate choice may be...

2013-08-16 10:09:08

The essence of male beauty is down to the way males use their genes rather than what genes they have, according to a new study into the sexual attractiveness of turkeys. Geneticists have long puzzled over why individuals of the same sex show a greater or lesser degree of sexual attractiveness. In other words - why are some people better looking than others when they're genetically similar? In a new study, published today in the journal PLoS Genetics, scientists turned to male wild...

Sexuality Bonobo Female Dominance
2013-07-16 08:36:25

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Among mammalian species, female social dominance is rare. However, one of our closest living relatives, bonobos, are known for the relatively high statuses females hold in social groups. This puzzles researchers as the males are often bigger and stronger than the females. A new study from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has analyzed the dominance relations between male and female wild bonobos, taking particular...

2013-07-10 10:34:21

Some people possess a small number of cells in their bodies that are not genetically their own; this condition is known as microchimerism. It is difficult to determine potential health effects from this condition because of humans’ relatively long life-spans. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that microchimerism can be found in dogs as well. Jeffrey Bryan, an associate professor of oncology at the MU College of Veterinary Medicine and director of...

2013-06-11 11:12:09

Females play a larger role in determining paternity than previously thought, say biologists in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences. Their findings are the subject of a new paper titled "Female mediation of competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster," published this month by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Stefan Lüpold, a research assistant professor in the college's Department of Biology and...

Chin Preference Changes Across Several Populations
2013-04-15 18:51:55

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study published in PLOS One suggests facial preferences across different populations vary. Northwestern University researchers tested the assumption that the presence of chin shape in picking a mate is consistent across human populations. However, they found when tested, this theory didn't hold true. "This suggests that either sexual selection hasn't been important in shaping chin shape in humans or that facial...

Mother Deer Protect Their Future Dominant Males While They Are Still In The Womb
2013-03-07 14:09:05

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new Brigham Young University (BYU) study has delved into the longstanding debate of “Nature versus Nurture,” proving that dominant male deer are often the result of a mother´s extra special care. According to the study, led by BYU student Eric Freeman, and published in the latest issue of PLoS ONE, a mother deer knows when her male offspring will be a great leader of deer, even as the male is still in the...

DNA Reveals Mating Patterns Of Endangered Sea Turtles
2013-02-04 09:21:46

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Many animals spend their lives living in remote or inaccessible areas of the planet, so understanding their various habits can require some ingenuity from the various scientists who study them. By tapping into their ingenuity, a group of U.K. researchers from the University of East Anglia has uncovered new information on the mating habits of endangered sea turtles. According to the research team´s report in the newest edition...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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