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Latest Sexual selection Stories

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2010-11-25 08:32:37

You may think of your love for your mate as the noble emotion of a pure heart, but some primitive parts of your brain are taking a decidedly more pragmatic approach to the subject, according to Stanford biologists. In experiments with African cichlid fish, the scientists discovered that when a female shows a preference for a particular male, but then witnesses him losing a fight with another male, her feelings toward him change. Areas of the female's brain associated with anxiety showed...

2010-11-15 16:52:07

How parental concerns could increase the size of our creative brains Evidence from Disneyland suggests that human creativity may have evolved not in response to sexual selection as some scientists believe but as a way to help parents bond with their children and to pass on traditions and cultural knowledge, a new study published in the inaugural issue of the International Journal of Tourism Anthropology suggests. Evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller of the University of New Mexico has...

2010-10-01 14:30:27

Our ideal image of the perfect partner differs greatly from our real-life partner, according to new research from the University of Sheffield and the University of Montpellier in France. The research found that our actual partners are of a different height, weight and body mass index than those we would ideally choose. The study, which was published this week (27 September 2010) in the Journal PLoS ONE, found that most men and women express different mating preferences for body morphology...

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2010-08-28 10:45:07

Less-pretty female house sparrows tend to lower their aim when selecting a mate. Addressing the lack of studies on condition-dependency of female mate choice, researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology found that female sparrows of a low quality prefer males of an equally low quality. Researchers from the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology in Vienna studied sexual selection preferences in the common house sparrow. Though it has always been assumed that females...

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2010-08-09 11:35:00

Researchers genetically engineer glow-in-the-dark sperm in fruit flies, revealing much more about sexual selection A lot has changed about the way scientists study sexual selection and reproduction. Some of it has to do with new tools; some of it has to do with new attitudes. There is a lot more going on than just "sperm meets egg." "It was simply thought of as "this army of sperm competing," so it functioned as a raffle; the more tickets you bought, the more sperm you transferred, the more...

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2010-08-03 09:39:51

It's a question that has puzzled scientists for years: why, in some species of spiders, are the females so much larger than their male counterparts? Now, investigators from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) believe they have found the answer. According to their findings, which are published in Wednesday's edition of the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, the cause is likely tied to bridging, a technique of transportation used by some spiders to cross large gaps. When...

2010-07-28 14:17:00

University of East Anglia research shows birds may increase their offspring's survival through infidelity Why does female infidelity occur so frequently throughout the animal kingdom? A 10-year study from the University of East Anglia published today shows that female birds may increase their offspring's survival through their infidelity. Although in many animals females may pair up with a specific 'social' mate who helps raise the pairs' offspring, DNA fingerprinting studies across a wide...

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2010-06-04 08:33:45

Natural and sexual selection in a wild insect population Tracing the success of individual wild insects in leaving descendants is now possible according to new research by University of Exeter biologists using a combination of digital video technology, tagging and DNA fingerprinting. Published on Friday 4 June, in Science, the study compares the behavior and ancestry of field crickets in their natural environment, allowing the researchers unprecedented insights into what insects actually get...

2010-05-14 09:42:46

Male physical competition, not attraction, was central in winning mates among human ancestors, according to a Penn State anthropologist. "There is sexual competition in many species, including humans," said David A. Puts, assistant professor of biological anthropology. Many researchers have considered mate choice the main operator in human sexual selection. They thought that people's mating success was mainly determined by attractiveness; but for men, it appears that physical competition...

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2010-05-03 09:26:45

Ever since Darwin, researchers have tried to explain the enormous diversity of plumage color traits in birds. Now researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, are adding something new to this particular field of research, which is so rich in tradition, by demonstrating how a bird can become red instead of yellow. Sixteen years ago, Malte Andersson, a professor at the University of Gothenburg, published the book Sexual Selection, which analyzed how animals use behavioral signals,...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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