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Latest Shearwater Stories

When Do Youngsters Fly The Nest?
2012-07-06 09:45:31

As seabirds mature and reach a time where they can fly the nest, their parents begin to feed them less each day. However, it is actually hormones that control when the chicks will leave home.

2010-01-28 13:20:20

Humans and human activities have clearly altered the Earth's landscape and oceans in countless ways, often to the detriment of other plants and animals.

b853719d8a99381ca467547ae5b9902b1
2009-01-16 13:20:00

British scientists have discovered that the Manx shearwaters make routine “stopovers” during their 12,400-mile migration, most likely to feed and rest.

2008-02-21 14:51:10

A collaborative effort between Microsoft, the University of Oxford and Freie Universitat, Berlin has resulted in a new GPS tracking system that can be adapted to study how animals interact with their environment.

2005-07-05 15:30:19

Wildlife officials are trying to determine what is killing hundreds of sea birds that have washed ashore in Virginia Beach and other locations along the Atlantic coast in the past several weeks.


Latest Shearwater Reference Libraries

Great-Winged Petrel, Pterodroma macroptera
2013-04-23 12:41:43

The Great-winged Petrel or Grey-faced Petrel (Pterodroma macroptera) is a petrel. In New Zealand, it is also known by its Maori name oi and as a muttonbird. The following are the two recognized subspecies of P. macroptera. - P. m. macroptera and P. m gouldi, the latter of the two is endemic to New Zealand, and is often called the Grey-faced Petrel. It breeds in the Southern Hemisphere between 30 and 50 degrees south having colonies on Tristan da Cunha, Gough Island, the Crozet Islands,...

Galapagos Shearwater, Puffinus subalaris
2013-04-21 09:15:46

The Galapagos Shearwater (Puffinus subalaris) is a petite shearwater. Until recently, it was considered to be a subspecies of Audubon’s Shearwater, but it is actually one of two members of a very ancient lineage of the small Puffinus species, the other being, as indicated by mtDNA cytochrome b sequence data, the Christmas Shearwater. It’s an endemic breeder of the Galapagos Islands, and is largely sedentary, although individuals are frequently seen as far as the Oaxacan coast of Mexico....

Great Shearwater, puffinus gravis
2013-01-01 14:28:01

The Great Shearwater (puffinus gravis) is a large shearwater in a seabird family called Procellariidae. There is unclear evidence of its relationships. The Great Shearwater belongs to a group consisting of large species that can be distinguished as genus Ardenna; within these, it might be associated with the other blunt-tailed black-billed species Short-tailed Shearwater and particularly the Sooty Shearwater. On the other hand, it could be a monotypic subgenus (ardenna sensu stricto), a...

The Flesh-Footed Shearwater, Puffinus carneipes
2012-10-29 14:26:36

The plumage of this bird is black, with pale pinkish feet, and a black-tipped pale bill. In flight, the undersides of the wings may appear silver. Flesh-footed Shearwater is 40-47 cm in length, 510-750 g in weight, and the wingspan is 99-107 cm long. Breeding in colonies, these birds have two main breeding areas; one in the Southwest Pacific Ocean including Lord Howe Island and Northern New Zealand; the second being along the cost of Western Australia from Cape Leeuwin to the Recherche...

Christmas Shearwater
2012-04-03 13:55:30

The Christmas Shearwater, (Puffinus nativitatis), is a species of bird found throughout the tropical Central Pacific islands, including the Hawaiian Islands, Tuamotu, the Marshall Islands, Kiritimati and Sala-y-Gómez. It has become locally extinct on a number of islands within its range. During the non-breeding seasons it extends across the Pacific, with some records reaching Mexico and Guatemala in the east, and Bonin Islands in the west. It is a rare vagrant further south, being recorded...

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Word of the Day
sipe
  • a slit in a tire to drain away surface water and improve traction.
The word 'sipe' comes from Old English and is related to 'seep'.
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