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Latest Shoaling and schooling Stories

2009-08-28 10:16:36

Fish and some amphibians possess a unique sensory capability in the so-called lateral-line system. It allows them, in effect, to "touch" objects in their surroundings without direct physical contact or to "see" in the dark. Professor Leo van Hermmen and his team in the physics department of the Technische Universities Muenchen are exploring the fundamental basis for this sensory system. What they discover might one day, through biomimetic engineering, better equip robots to orient themselves...

2009-06-29 10:03:58

It might be assumed that aquarium fish don't mind who or what they encounter in their tanks from one minute to the next, if their famously (but incorrectly) short memory is to be believed. Scientists at the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter have carried out research to show this is not the case and are striving to improve conditions for keeping fish in home aquaria.In line with the aim to establish welfare guidelines for fish, these researchers have been collaborating with the WALTHAM...

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2009-06-18 05:40:00

Scientists have discovered that sticklebacks exhibit an advanced, sophisticated learning technique never before seen in the animal world.  The research reveals that the learning methods of fish may resemble that of humans more than previously believed. The study, conducted by researchers at St. Andrews University and Durham University in Britain, found that nine-spined sticklebacks can observe others to make better decisions. This ability to select the best food patch by comparing how...

2009-04-29 10:14:26

A U.S. researcher says he has developed a test that suggests fish can feel pain and they react to it much as do humans. Purdue University Assistant Professor Joseph Garner and Janicke Nordgreen, a doctoral student in the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, attached small foil heaters to goldfish and slowly increased the temperature. Half of the fish were injected with morphine, and the others received saline. The researchers believed those with the morphine would be able to withstand...

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2009-03-27 06:45:00

Conservationists are now able to watch the movement of large groups of fish as they gather into sandbanks. According to a report in Friday's edition of the journal Science, researchers were able to watch Atlantic herring gather off Georges Bank near Cape Cod, Mass., where they spawn during the night. At dawn, the mass of fish return to the deep and scatter. According to Nicholas C. Makris, professor of mechanical and ocean engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the team...

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2008-12-10 14:14:35

Marine biologists say that many female bottlenose dolphins in Western Australia's Shark Bay area spend a disproportionately large amount of time using sponges to root for prey on the ocean floor. They say this causes some dolphins to work longer hours than others for their food. Scientists say the female bottlenose dolphins living in 30- to 50-foot-deep channels off Australia's western coast that bury their noses in sponges and use them as tools to root through the sandy ocean floor for...

2008-10-02 03:00:25

By Pondella, Daniel J II Froeschke, John T; Wetmore, Lynne S; Miller, Eric; Valle, Charles F; Medeiros, Lea Abstract: The yellowfin croaker, Umbrina roncador Jordan & Gilbert, 1882, is a common nearshore and surf-zone species in the southern California bight. Age was determined for individuals (n = 1,209) using annual increments in otoliths, and size at age was modeled using the von Bertalanffy growth curve (L^sub [infinity]^ = 307.754 mm, k = 0.278 yr^sup -1^, t^sub 0^ = -0.995 yr;...

2008-08-24 12:00:14

By John Schwartz Many sushi restaurants and seafood markets are playing a game of bait and switch, say two high school students turned high-tech sleuths. In a tale of teenagers, sushi and science, Kate Stoeckle and Louisa Strauss, who graduated this year from the private Trinity School in New York , took on a freelance science project in which they checked 60 samples of seafood, using a simplified genetic fingerprinting technique to see whether what the fish diners buy is what they...

2008-07-02 21:00:11

By Dennis Taylor, The Monterey County Herald, Calif. Jul. 2--Monterey will never again be known as "The Sardine Capital of the World," as it was in the 1930s and '40s, but three fishing boats delivered 135 tons of sardines to Wharf No. 2 early Tuesday, a haul that drew an upbeat proclamation from a local captain. "The ocean is healthy," said Tom Noto, a third-generation Monterey fisher who pilots the Lady J. "We're seeing a lot of big schools of sardines out there right now, just like in...

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2008-05-08 14:53:24

Since ancient times, locust plagues have been viewed as one of the most spectacular events in nature. In seemingly spontaneous fashion, as many as 10 billion critters can suddenly swarm the air and carpet the ground, blazing destructive paths that bring starvation and economic ruin.What makes them do it?A team of scientists led by Iain Couzin of Princeton University and including colleagues at the University of Oxford and the University of Sydney believes it may finally have an answer to this...


Latest Shoaling and schooling Reference Libraries

0_8264938965f2193ff680e3d9b69c3134
2008-10-16 17:53:14

The Obtuse Barracuda (Sphyraena obtusata) is a member of the barracuda family Sphyraenidae. It is found in tropical oceans of the world. It has a length of up to 21.5 inches long. It is an elongated fish with widely separated dorsal fins. The back is greenish and the underside is silver with three unclear dark brown longitudinal bands, two above and one below the lateral line. Its snout is pointed and has a large mouth filled with sharp, widely spaced teeth. The Obtuse Barracuda is a...

39_8e94f734b985a0aed8ec273d06825a6d
2007-04-03 00:29:38

The Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, is the one of the most abundant species of fish on the planet. They can be found on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean congregating together in large schools (or swarms). They can grow up to 17.72 in (45 cm) in length and weigh more than 1.1 lb (0.5 kg). They feed on copepods, krill and small fish, and their natural predators are seals, whales, cod and other larger fish. The Atlantic herring fishery has long been an important part of the economy of New...

39_f9151cf23a430c1317025f0e2325318a
2007-03-12 19:58:49

The Blue runner (Caranx crysos) is a fish found along the coastlines of the Atlantic Ocean, mostly in the inland waters of the east coast of North America and the west coast of Africa. The fish has a rounded body shape and can grow to up to 27.56 in (70cm) long and weigh more than 11 lb (5kg). The body is silvery blue in color with a large eye. Blue runners are known as very fast and aggressive fish, traveling in schools and eating smaller fish and invertebrates. Schools may also pick...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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