Quantcast

Shoveler Reference Libraries

Page 1 of about 4 Articles
Cape Shoveler Anas smithii
2012-04-02 15:05:15

The Cape Shoveler, (Anas smithii), is a species of dabbling duck native to South Africa. It is also commonly found further north in Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, southern Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, and Zambia. Its habitats are open wetlands such as grassland or marshes with some emergent vegetation. This bird is non-migratory, but does have some seasonal movements. The birds binomial (species)...

Australasian Shoveler
2008-11-25 21:47:21

The Australasian Shoveler (Anas rhynchotis), is a species of dabbling duck found in Australia. It is a protected species under the National Parks and Wildlife Act, 1974. Adults are 18 to 21 inches in length. Males have a blue-gray head with a vertical white crescent. Its habitat is heavily vegetated swamps. Photo Copyright and Credit

Red Shoveler
2008-11-25 21:38:58

The Red Shoveler (Anas platalea), is a species of dabbling duck found in southern South America, mainly in Argentina. It migrates to Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay and Brazil in winter. It is a rare vagrant to the Falkland Islands. Its habitat is shallow lakes and pools with dense reed beds, marshes and lagoons. Adults are 18 to 22.5 inches long and weigh 19.2 to 20.8 ounces. Its diet includes...

Northern Shoveler
2005-06-02 08:28:42

The Shoveler or Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata) is a common and widespread dabbling duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and across most of North America. This bird is strongly migratory and winters further south than its breeding range. It is not as sociable as some dabbling ducks outside the breeding season and tends to form only small flocks. Due to its large...

Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
Related