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Latest Siberian Traps Stories

Permian Mass Extinction May Have Happened In The Blink Of An Eye
2014-02-11 05:07:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, the largest mass extinction event in the history of animal life on Earth occurred — wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of terrestrial species. This included the largest insects known to have inhabited the planet. Scientists have explored many theories to explain the cause of the end-Permian extinction, as it came to be known. Those theories include an asteroid...

Extinction Event During End Of The Permian Period Likely Due To Acid Rain
2013-11-23 05:08:21

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the end of the Permian period, approximately 250 million years ago, a mass extinction occurred that was so severe it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth's history. Previous research has suggested that contemporaneous volcanic eruptions in Siberia might have triggered this extinction. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the atmospheric effects of these eruptions could have been...

Earth’s Largest Extinction Event - Was It Caused By Siberian Volcanism?
2012-01-10 05:57:28

Around 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian geologic period, there was a mass extinction so severe that it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth´s history. Although the cause of this event is a mystery, it has been speculated that the eruption of a large swath of volcanic rock in Russia called the Siberian Traps was a trigger for the extinction. New research from Carnegie´s Linda Elkins-Tanton and her co-authors offers insight into how this volcanism...

The Cause Of Earth's Largest Environmental Catastrophe
2011-09-15 08:14:44

  Siberian traps and their relation to the mass extinction 250 million years ago The eruption of giant masses of magma in Siberia 250 million years ago led to the Permo-Triassic mass extinction when more than 90 % of all species became extinct. An international team including geodynamic modelers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences together with geochemists from the J. Fourier University of Grenoble, the Max Plank Institute in Mainz, and Vernadsky-, Schmidt- and...

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2011-01-24 06:30:00

After a volcanic eruption that occurred around 250 million years ago, hundreds of millions of years before dinosaurs were wiped off the face of the planet, almost 95 percent of all primitive life living in the ocean and 70 percent of all animals evolving on land were wiped out. Researchers at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada have discovered evidence suggesting that massive volcanic eruptions at the time burnt significant levels of coal, producing suffocating clouds of ash and...

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2008-08-31 10:00:00

By Robert S. Boyd / McClatchy Newspapers It was the greatest mass murder of all time - poison everywhere, billions slain - but the killers have never been positively identified. An estimated 95 percent of marine species and 85 percent of land creatures died, said Peter Ward, a paleobiologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. Scientists call it "The Great Dying." Life took millions of years to recover. Scientific sleuths now think they're making progress toward learning what...

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2006-03-09 09:00:52

University scientists suggest extraterrestrial theories are flawed and that more down to earth factors could have accounted for past mass extinctions Leicester -- Earth history has been punctuated by several mass extinctions rapidly wiping out nearly all life forms on our planet. What causes these catastrophic events? Are they really due to meteorite impacts? Current research suggests that the cause may come from within our own planet "“ the eruption of vast amounts of lava that brings...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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