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Latest SIDS Stories

infant sofa sleeping
2014-10-14 05:18:23

A new study in the journal Pediatrics has found that a significant number of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) cases can be attributed to the infant sleeping on a sofa.

2014-06-09 23:11:17

The BirthCare Center in Daytona Beach Now Offers Classes to New and Expecting Parents Teaching the Guidelines to Help Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Daytona

2014-05-05 11:27:52

Since 1994, parents have been urged to put their babies to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Infant Bed Sharing On The Rise
2013-10-01 13:37:36

Despite many experts advising against it, the number of infants sharing a bed with their parents or a sibling increased between 1993 and 2010.

2013-09-18 23:19:34

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is the largest cause of infant death; with its new 800+ users, Owlet will create the largest data set of infant health.

Laying Babies On Side Or Back Can Cause Flattened Skull
2013-07-08 12:48:07

A new study has found that the practice of lying babies on their side or back to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) can often cause a flat spot to develop on a child's skull.

2013-06-11 23:23:56

Children of women who consume alcohol while pregnant are three times more likely to die from SIDS – Sudden Infant Death Syndrome – compared to women who do not have alcohol issues, according

2013-05-22 23:01:18

Research has shown that a majority of breastfeeding mothers bedshare at some point because they need more sleep and it makes breastfeeding easier at night.

Fivefold Risk Increase Of SIDS When Parents, Babies Bed Share
2013-05-21 07:11:50

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), also known as cot death, remains a major cause of death for babies less than a year old in developed nations despite a growing consensus that sleeping with a baby increases risk of death.


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.