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Latest Sifaka Stories

2014-01-31 11:06:37

The strength of a lemur couple's bond is reflected in the similarity of their scents The strength of a lemur couple's bond is reflected by the similarity of their scents, finds a new study. "It's like singing a duet, but with smells instead of sounds," said Christine Drea, a Duke University professor who supervised the study. Duke researchers sampled and analyzed scent secretions produced by lemurs known as Coquerel's sifakas living at the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, NC. The...

Finding How Many Coquerel’s Aifaka Exist
2014-01-29 10:45:57

Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência In a study now published in the American Journal of Primatology, Célia Kun-Rodrigues and Jordi Salmona, from Lounès Chikhi’s laboratory at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) provide the first abundance estimates of Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli), an endangered lemur species, in its last main refugium, the Ankarafantsika National Park (ANP) in Madagascar. Madagascar is one of the hottest Biodiversity hotspots, well known by the...

New Understanding Of Why Female Milne-Edwards' Sifakas Outlive Males
2013-03-01 08:08:03

National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) Researchers studying aging in an endangered lemur known as the Milne-Edwards' sifaka report that in old age, females are the safer sex. After observing these animals for more than two decades in the wild in Madagascar, co-author Patricia Wright of Stony Brook University had a hunch that females were living longer than their male counterparts. Females tend to outlive males in many animals, including humans. But in the Milne-Edwards'...

Past Influences On Biodiversity In Madagascar
2012-07-25 10:35:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While human activity is usually identified as the primary threat to biodiversity through the loss of species, a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences (PNAS) focused on identifying pre-human causes of pressures that threaten endangered species. The latest research focused on Madagascar, which is world-renowned for its biodiversity and has been plagued by deforestation and the destruction of...

2009-05-27 09:13:49

Madagascar, where natural environments show a high level of endemism, is one of the last great biodiversity sanctuaries in the world. The island is home to a special group of primates, the lemurs. There are presently 15 genera and 71 species of these small mammals on Madagascar. The genus Palaeopropithecus is a group of subfossil giant lemurs (2). Up until now, two species had been described: P. ingens (in 1898) and P. maximus (in 1903). Palaeopropithecus have very specific adaptations,...

2008-04-10 16:22:37

Loads of freakish animals, from fingertip-size chameleons to bug-eyed lemurs, crowd the island of Madagascar. Now researchers have combed the island's nooks and crannies to create a map of critical animal hideouts in need of protection. The map is part of a new plan to expand the current reserve areas, boosting the number of species protected within them from some 70 percent to 100 percent, the researchers say. The plan is based on a new computer model designed to spot regions...

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2008-03-19 18:10:00

Analysis of the first hand bones belonging to an ancient lemur has revealed a mysterious joint structure that has scientists puzzled.Pierre Lemelin, an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and a team of fellow American researchers have analyzed the first hand bones ever found of Hadropithecus stenognathus, a lemur that lived 2,000 years ago. The bones were discovered in 2003 in a cave in southeastern Madagascar, an island nation off the coast of...

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2005-04-07 07:20:00

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) -- Human activities such as hunting and logging have driven nearly one quarter of the world's primate species - man's closest living relatives - to the brink of extinction, according to a new report. Without concerted action, great apes such as the Sumatran orangutan of Indonesia and the Eastern gorilla of central Africa are at risk of disappearing, according to the report to be released Thursday by the World Conservation Union, the International Primatological...


Latest Sifaka Reference Libraries

Crowned Sifaka, Propithecus coronatus
2012-08-08 08:43:18

The crowned sifaka (Propithecus coronatus) is native to Madagascar, with a range that extends to the Mahavavy River in the southwest. The northeastern border of this range is the Betsiboka River. It has been reported that the crowned sifaka occurs in south and southeast Madagascar, which may broaden its range. It prefers to reside in arid deciduous forests in western Madagascar. The crowned sifaka can reach an average body length of 3.3 feet, with a tail length between 1.5 and 1.8 feet....

Golden Crowned Sifaka, Propithecus tattersalli
2012-06-07 12:10:18

The golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli), also known as Tattersall’s sifaka, can only be found on the island of Madagascar. Within its range, it is known by natives as ankomba malandy, or akomba malandy, which means “white lemur”. Its range is small, comprising only 44 fragmented forest areas that surround the town of Daraina. The borders of this range include the Manambato River and the Loky River. Studies show that the 44 areas total only 170 square miles. This sifaka can...

Perrier's Sifaka, Propithecus perrieri
2012-06-05 12:59:41

Perrier's sifaka (Propithecus perrieri) is native only to the island of Madagascar, like all of its lemur relatives. Its northeastern range is small, extending from the Irodo Riverin in the north to the Lokia River in the south. It prefers habitats within arid, deciduous forests. Perrier’s sifaka is typically all black in color and can have a total body length of three feet, with the tail comprising up to 1.5 feet of that length. It can be seen in groups between two to six individuals,...

Milne-Edward’s Sifaka, Propithecus edwardsi
2012-06-05 12:46:05

Milne-Edward’s sifaka (Propithecus edwardsi), also known as Milne-Edwards simpona, is native only to the island of Madagascar. It resides on the coast, in the southeastern forests of the island. They prefer habitats within altitudes of 2,000 to 5,200 feet in primary and secondary rainforests. The Onive River and the Mangoro River make up the borders of the northern part of this lemurs range. Its range extends south to the Rienana River and Andringitra National Park. It shares this range...

Diademed Sifaka, Propithecus diadema
2012-06-05 10:46:49

The diademed sifaka (Propithecus diadema) is also commonly called the diademed simpona. It is one of the many endangered species of lemur and is native only to the island of Madagascar. It is thought that this large sifaka hold one of the largest ranges of all sifakas, although a conclusive study has not been conducted. It prefers habitats at altitudes between 656 and 2,624 feet within lowland forests and 2,624 to 5,084 feet within certain areas of subhumid forests. Its range extends from...

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