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Siganidae Reference Libraries

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Masked Spinefoot Siganus puellus
2013-03-15 12:10:27

The masked spinefoot, also called a decorated rabbitfish or masked rabbitfish, lives in shallow coral rich lagoons, and seaward reefs of the Indo-West Pacific, at depths of 10 to 100 feet. The body of the masked spinefoot is a yellow-orange that gradients into a pale blue or white belly. It also has vertical blue lines toward the head and horizontal lines near the tail. A black stripe...

Foxface Rabbitfish Siganus vulpinus
2013-02-17 07:58:30

Image Credit: Dr. Wayne Meadows (NOAA)/Wikipedia The foxface rabbitfish is found in coral rich lagoons, and reefs in the coastal water of the Western Pacific. Around the western Philippines, Indonesia, New Guinea, the Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, Caroline Islands, and the Marshall Islands. It has also been sighted around Vanuatu, Nauru, Kiribati, and recently Tonga. Adults usually...

Streaked Spinefoot Siganus javus
2013-01-14 15:21:15

The streaked spinefoot is native to the Indo-Pacific, living around coral reefs in shallow brackish (salty) waters. The range of this species is widely dispersed throughout the region with most of the population occupying the coastal waters from northern Australia to southern Japan, and from eastern Africa to New Guinea. The streaked spinefoot is bronze in color, clear pectoral fins, with a...

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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