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Latest Silphidae Stories

Bigger Not Always Better Says New Research On Beetles
2014-04-30 13:34:02

University of Exeter Researchers at the University of Exeter have found that the probability of a burying beetle winning fights, for the small animal carcasses it needs, depends on a combination of early life experiences and the competition it faces as an adult. These beetles use small dead animals, such as mice and songbirds, to provide food for their young and competition for a carcass can be fierce. Previous work has found that success in such contests depends on how good your...

2014-02-24 12:22:10

Mitigation challenges for Oil & Gas companies in Oklahoma gets a little easier with the USFWS approval of a new conservation bank for the American Burying Beetle. EDMOND, Okla., Feb. 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Burying Beetle Conservation Bank ("ABBCB") was approved by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service ("USFWS") on February 14 to provide conservation credits across Eastern Oklahoma. The ABBCB will create approximately 700 turn-key conservation offsets for...

New Species Of Burying Beetle Discovered
2013-06-21 10:12:47

Pensoft Publishers Scientists discovered a new species of burying beetle, Nicrophorus efferens. Burying beetles are well known to most naturalists because of their large size, striking black and red colors, and interesting reproductive behaviors - they bury small vertebrate carcasses which their offspring eat in an underground crypt, guarded by both parents. The study was published in the open access journal Zookeys. This new species, known from only 6 specimens collected in 1968, sat...

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2008-09-01 10:55:00

A new study by researchers at the University of Basel's Zoological Institute illustrates the complex nature of the relationship between parent and offspring, even among insects. The study found that larvae and nymphs actively solicit their parents for food, protection and affection, doing everything from kicking their mother in the face to hitting her with their antennae to get what they want. The research may hold clues about how such manipulation first evolved in certain species, including...

2007-12-19 19:18:31

Most parents would hotly deny favouring one child over another but new research suggests they may have little choice in the matter. Biologists studying a unique species of beetle that raises and cares for its young have found that parents instinctively favour the oldest offspring. The University of Manchester research "“ published in Ecology this month "“ supports the findings of studies carried out on human families but is significant in that it suggests a wholly natural tendency...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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