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Latest Simian immunodeficiency virus Stories

2011-09-23 11:08:54

A new computational approach has predicted numerous human proteins that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) requires to replicate itself. These discoveries "constitute a powerful resource for experimentalists who desire to discover new targets for human proteins that can control the spread of HIV," according to the authors of this study that appears in the Sept. 22, 2011 issue of PLoS Computational Biology, a journal published by the Public Library of Science. The authors of the article...

2011-09-23 11:05:21

A new computational approach has predicted numerous human proteins that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) requires to replicate itself, and "constitutes a powerful resource for experimentalists who desire to discover new human proteins that can control the spread of HIV," according to the authors of a study, which will be published in the open-access journal PLoS Computational Biology on Thursday 22nd September 2011. "Drugs used to cure HIV become rapidly ineffective because HIV is...

2011-07-18 14:59:00

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., July 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Scientists at Osel Inc. and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a new way to prevent HIV infection by genetically enhancing the ability of naturally occurring vaginal bacteria to block viral transmission. Bioengineered bacteria introduced into the vaginal cavity of macaques--a commonly used experimental primate--reduced the transmission of simian HIV (SHIV) by nearly two thirds. The novel approach takes advantage of...

2011-06-27 21:10:07

Sooty mangabeys, a type of African monkey, have intrigued scientists for years because they can survive infection by SIV, a relative of HIV, and not succumb to AIDS. Researchers have identified a way some of sooty mangabeys' immune cells resist infection: they close the gates that SIV and HIV use to get into the cell. The findings may lead to strategies to help HIV-infected individuals cope better with infection. The results are published online in the journal Nature Medicine. "We have shown...

2011-05-12 00:03:55

Research conducted at Oregon Health & Science University's Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute (VGTI) has developed a vaccine candidate in non-human primates that may eventually lead to a vaccine against Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Details of this advance are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature. The paper will also be published in an upcoming print addition of the journal. The research team, led by Louis Picker, M.D., associate director of the OHSU VGTI...

2011-05-06 00:23:25

Finding Could Aid Development of HIV Vaccine for Humans WHAT: Using a monkey model of AIDS, scientists have identified a vaccine-generated immune-system response that correlates with protection against infection by the monkey version of HIV, called simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The researchers found that neutralizing antibodies generated by immunization were associated with protection against SIV infection. This finding marks an important step toward understanding how an effective HIV...

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2011-05-05 05:40:00

Some monkeys are born with a certain gene that boosts protection against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a trait that could help researchers develop better AIDS vaccines, according to a study released Wednesday. The researchers vaccinated a group of rhesus monkeys, and then repeatedly exposed them to SIV over the course of two weeks.  They found that while half of the monkeys became infected, the other half, which was more likely to express a certain gene known as TRIM5, did not....

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2010-09-17 09:25:00

The immunodeficiency condition found in monkeys that was the ancestor of the HIV virus is far older than first believed, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Arizona and Tulane University. The study is published in Friday's edition of the journal Science. "The simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV, is at least 32,000 to 75,000 years old, and likely much older, according to a genetic analysis of unique SIV strains found in monkeys on Bioko Island, a former peninsula...

2010-08-25 13:34:28

The human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) originated as viruses of apes and monkeys, respectively, yet little is known about whether or how these invaders adapted to the new genetic "environment" encountered in humans. One group of host genes, collectively known as restriction factors, is thought to influence the ability of such viruses to move between different primate species. A study conducted by Andrea Kirmaier and Welkin Johnson of Harvard Medical School, together with Dr. Vanessa Hirsch...

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2010-04-16 12:38:03

An increase in the release of monocytes from bone marrow into the bloodstream predicts how rapidly AIDS develops in monkeys and the magnitude of monocyte turnover correlates with the severity of brain disease in AIDS, Boston College researchers report in the current edition of the online journal PLoS Pathogens. The researchers report the first observation within AIDS of a marker in blood or plasma exclusive to monocytes, which underscores the relationship between innate immune response and...


Latest Simian immunodeficiency virus Reference Libraries

Sooty Mangabey, Cercocebus atys
2012-06-28 20:49:18

The sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys) is an Old World Monkey that can be found throughout the area stretching from Senegal to eastern Ghana. Its other common names include the white-naped mangabey, the white-crowned mangabey, and the white-collared mangabey, which causes some confusion with the collared mangabey. There are currently two recognized subspecies of this mangabey, although they can be considered distinct species. The sooty mangabey resides in forests within its range, preferring...

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2011-02-23 20:58:48

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), also known as African Green Monkey virus, is a retrovirus able to infect at least 33 species of African primates. SIV has been present in monkeys and apes for at least 32,000 years, probably longer. Strains from two of these primate species have crossed the barriers into humans resulting in HIV-2 and HIV-1. Contraction involves contact with the blood of chimps that are often hunted for bushmeat in Africa. SIV infections appear in many cases to be...

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