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Latest Single-nucleotide polymorphism Stories

2010-02-25 15:17:51

Researchers from the Ohio State University have developed a rapid, multiplexed genotyping method to identify the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that affect warfarin dose. The related report by Yang et al, "Rapid Genotyping of SNPs Influencing Warfarin Drug Response by SELDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry," appears in the March 2010 issue of the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. Warfarin is an anti-coagulant that is commonly used to prevent blood clots and embolism. However, warfarin dosing is...

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2010-02-19 14:55:00

A few minor variations in one gene may make a difference in athletic endurance, according to a new study from Physiological Genomics. The study found that elite endurance athletes were more likely to have variations of the NRF2 gene than elite sprinters. Non-elite endurance athletes were also more likely to have the genetic variations compared to sprinters, although the difference was not as pronounced. The study shows an association between the gene variation and endurance, but does not...

2010-02-18 08:58:21

Analyzing the genomic structure of five men descended from the hunter-gatherers of southern Africa "“ including famed South African Bishop Desmond Tutu "“ reveals surprising ways in which the genetic codes of these groups differ from others in the world and from each other, said a consortium of experts including those from Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears today in the journal Nature. In the report, the group describes the fully sequenced genomes of an individual...

2010-02-04 14:38:11

Study finds association between genes that regulate maternal inflammatory response, bacterial vaginosis and preterm delivery In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting â“ž¢, in Chicago, researchers will show the use of haplotype tagging (hap-tag) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to study the relationship between genetic predispositions, an environmental factor - bacterial...

2010-01-26 13:26:17

Researchers challenge prevailing assumptions in interpreting genome-wide studies In the decade since the Human Genome Project produced the first map of DNA sequences in the human genome, scientists throughout the world have combed through genome data to identify genes and gene variants that cause human disease. A new study suggests that researchers may need to broaden their search farther afield to pinpoint rare but powerful disease-causing mutations. Researchers from two large genome...

2010-01-26 12:29:37

Scientists at Duke University Medical Center say they are now convinced that rare genetic variants "“ as opposed to more common ones "“ lie at the heart of the genetic component of most common diseases. The finding appearing in PLoS Biology, stems from a series of simulation studies, and challenges common interpretations of a multitude of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have identified thousands of single-DNA letter changes associated with greater risk of common...

2010-01-07 18:56:57

Gene variants associated with increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, are not associated with an increased risk of cancer, according to a new brief communication published online January 7 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Stig E. Bojesen, M.D., Ph.D., of the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, and Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues used a Mendelian randomization design to test whether C-reactive...

2009-12-25 21:57:50

Genomic switches can predispose an individual to one set of autoimmune disorders but protect the same person against another set of them, scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine have found. "Maybe we should stop considering all autoimmune diseases in one lumped category," said Atul Butte, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics and of biomedical informatics and director of the Center for Pediatric Bioinformatics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. "It looks as if there may...

2009-12-16 12:57:00

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, December 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Scientists at deCODE genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq:DCGN) publish in the journal Nature the discovery of a version of a common single-letter variant in the sequence of the human genome (SNP) with a major impact on susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). The impact of the T2D variant is not only large, but unusual: if an individual inherits it from their father, the variant increases risk of T2D by more than 30% compared to those who...

2009-12-07 19:29:11

Eighteen single-point genetic variations indicate risk of recurrence for early-stage head and neck cancer patients and their likelihood of developing a second type of cancer, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reported at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference. The team examined 241 single nucleotide polymorphisms - variations of a single DNA building block in a gene - in eight genes involved in the...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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