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Latest Sinoatrial node Stories

Understanding The Link Between Age And Decreased Maximum Heart Rate
2013-10-15 07:29:52

[ Watch the Video: Link Between Age And Decreased Maximum Heart Rate ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As we age, our maximum heart rate (maxHR) decreases, limiting the performance of aging athletes. Decreased maxHR is also a leading cause for nursing home admittance for otherwise-healthy elderly individuals who no longer have the physical capacity required for independent living. Until now, however, the reasons for decreased maxHR due to age have been unclear....

2011-12-27 11:48:33

Arrhythmia is a potentially life-threatening problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat, causing it to go too fast, too slow or to beat irregularly. Arrhythmia affects millions of people worldwide. The cardiac conduction system (CCS) regulates the rate and rhythm of the heart. It is a group of specialized cells in the walls of the heart. These cells control the heart rate by sending electrical signals from the sinoatrial node in the heart's right atrium (upper chamber) to the...

2011-09-09 13:29:04

Ion channels ensure the heart keeps time The heartbeat is the result of rhythmic contractions of the heart muscle, which are in turn regulated by electrical signals called action potentials. Action potentials result from the controlled flow of ions into heart muscle cells (depolarization) through channels in their membranes, and are followed by a compensating reverse ion current (repolarization), which restores the original state. If the duration of the repolarization phase is not just...

2011-03-09 14:40:50

Pacemaker cells in the sinoatrial node control heart rate, but what controls the ticking of these pacemaker cells? New research by Angelo Torrente and his colleagues of the M.E. Mangoni group's, reveals, for the first time, a critical functional interaction between Cav1.3 calcium ion (Ca2+) channels and ryanodine-receptor (RyR) mediated Ca2+ signaling. The study also sheds light on a long-standing debate regarding the relative contributions of the 'funny current' generated by ion channels and...

2010-08-17 17:05:33

New research in the Journal of General Physiology helps explain how the body's "flight-or-fight" response is mediated. The study, which may provide new answers to the question of how the heart pacemaker"”the sinoatrial (SA) node"”is regulated, appears online on August 16 (www.jgp.org). When the body goes into "flight-or-flight" response as a reaction to stress, the increased firing rate of the SA node increases the heart rate and cardiac output to deliver more oxygen and nutrients...

2010-07-06 13:39:24

Scientists at The University of Manchester have solved a mystery connected with why people die from sudden cardiac arrest during sleep "“ potentially saving thousands of lives. The pioneering research, using detailed computer models, could help save lives through preventative treatment of those most at risk from a form of heart rhythm disorder called sick sinus syndrome. This occurs when the activity of the heart's pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, is impaired. Up to now, no-one has been...

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2009-04-09 13:29:39

Artificial heart pacemakers have saved and extended the lives of thousands of people, but they have their shortcomings "“ such as a fixed pulse rate and a limited life. Could a permanent biological solution be possible? Richard Robinson and colleagues at New York's Columbia and Stony Brook Universities certainly think so, and their work published in the latest issue of The Journal of Physiology brings the dream a step closer to reality. The body's own natural pacemaker, called the...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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