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Latest SIR-Spheres Stories

2011-08-16 07:40:00

Corporate Pledge of $50,000 Supports Major Fund-raising Initiative to Expand Minimally Invasive Medicine Into New Areas of Discovery FAIRFAX, Va., Aug.

2011-07-07 01:00:00

PAMPLONA, Spain, July 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Results of the multi-centre European Network on Radioembolization with Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres (ENRY) analysis of the long-term outcomes related to survival and safety of radioembolization using SIR-Spheres in patients with inoperable primary liver tumours were published on-line today in Hepatology, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Association of the Study of Liver Diseases.[1] Evaluation of 325 patients with...

2011-04-03 21:51:37

Thalidomide has shown potential to be used as the first adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to data presented at the International Liver CongressTM 2011.

2010-08-19 15:17:00

BRUSSELS, August 19, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Using the innovative technique of radioembolisation to treat patients with inoperable colorectal cancer liver metastases who have failed all standard-of-care chemotherapy options can more than double the time until their disease progresses, according to the final results of a Phase III randomised controlled trial published in the prestigious Journal of Clinical Oncology.(1) The prospective, randomised trial compared a protracted infusion of...

2010-08-19 08:36:00

ROME, August 19, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Radioactive yttrium-90 labelled resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex Medical, Sydney, Australia) appear to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases who have failed available chemotherapy options, according to the final results of a prospective clinical multi-centre phase II trial conducted by the Italian Society of Locoregional Therapies in Oncology (SITILO) and published in the British Journal of...


Word of the Day
begunk
  • To befool; deceive; balk; jilt.
  • An illusion; a trick; a cheat.
The word 'begunk' may come from a nasalised variant of Scots begeck ("to deceive, disappoint"), equivalent to be- +‎ geck.