Quantcast

Latest Sirolimus Stories

2009-09-21 14:30:31

Results of a multicenter study in Asia, demonstrating that drug-eluting stents are effective with a low rate of complications in diabetic patients, will be presented at the 21st annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). The study, "The Effect of Drug-Eluting Stents on Clinical and Angiographic Outcomes in Diabetic Patients: Multicenter Registry in Asia," compared the safety and efficacy of sirolimus...

2009-07-14 12:00:57

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is ordering manufacturers of some immunosuppressant drugs used in kidney transplants to change their labeling. The FDA said the updated labels must reflect an increased risk of infections. The required label changes affect drugs used to help prevent rejection of transplanted organs. The drugs are Rapamune (sirolimus), Sandimmune (cyclosporine), and three generic drugs, Neoral (cyclosporine modified), Cellcept (mycophenolate mofetil) and Myfortic...

4f646b6b7bc94ced7193575316c474711
2009-07-08 15:30:00

A compound in the soil of Easter Island in the South Pacific significantly extends the lifespan of older mice, researchers at the University of Texas reported on Wednesday. The molecule, known as "rapamycin" after the island's Polynesian name, Rapa Nui, is a bacterial byproduct discovered in a sample obtained from the remote Pacific archipelago during the 1970s. The researchers gave the rapamycin to mice that were the human equivalent of 60 years old, and found it expanded lifespans by 28 to...

2009-07-08 14:00:25

Transplant patients rely on drugs to prevent graft rejection, but at the cost of serious side effects. The class of immunosuppressive drugs known as calcineurin inhibitors (examples are cyclosporine and tacrolimus) can damage patients' kidneys and lead to high blood pressure, among other problems.A combination of treatments can effectively replace calcineurin inhibitors in preventing graft rejection when kidney transplants are performed on monkeys, scientists at the Emory Transplant Center...

f9e31f191c2d600df341a5622c4df9ef1
2009-06-26 14:20:00

New research suggests that a common immunosuppressive drug may have the ability to boost the power of vaccines, BBC News reported. The drug rapamycin is commonly given to transplant patients to stop their bodies rejecting donor organs, but scientists at Emory University discovered during tests on mice and monkeys that it enhanced the response of their immune system to experimental vaccines. The study also raises hopes of a new generation of potent vaccines. According to the research published...

2009-06-22 10:06:34

Rapamycin, a drug given to transplant recipients to suppress their immune systems, has a paradoxical effect on cells responsible for immune memory, scientists at the Emory Vaccine Center have discovered.In experiments conducted in both mice and monkeys, rapamycin can stimulate the formation of memory CD8 T cells, which enable the immune system to respond faster and stronger to an infectious agent upon a second encounter.The results were published online ahead of print June 21 in Nature. The...

9a667d701bf8f1571949e44f18fca8a31
2009-06-15 16:30:00

Tumor metabolism discovery opens new detection and treatment possibilities for rare form of colon cancerPeople who suffer from Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, a rare inherited cancer syndrome, develop gastrointestinal polyps and are predisposed to colon cancer and other tumor types. Carefully tracing the cellular chain-of-command that links nutrient intake to cell growth (and which is interrupted in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome), allowed researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies to exploit...

2009-06-10 09:50:00

Rutgers researchers have discovered a potential new way to treat childhood epilepsy using a widely available therapeutic drug.Rutgers neuroscientist Gabriella D'Arcangelo and her colleagues have published their research findings in the journal Disease Models and Mechanisms (in press) and the paper has just appeared online.In their quest for new therapeutic approaches, the researchers are investigating the molecular basis of the disease. The article describes the first use of a mouse model of...

2009-06-02 16:01:35

U.S. researchers have found an FDA-approved drug that might prevent genetically caused epilepsy also might help prevent more common forms of the condition. Washington University School of Medicine researchers in St. Louis said they found the drug rapamycin may also help prevent forms of epilepsy caused by brain injury. The scientists determined rapamycin blocks brain changes believed to cause seizures in rats. In a paper last year, the same group showed rapamycin prevents brain changes in...

2009-06-02 07:59:59

A drug with potential to prevent epilepsy caused by a genetic condition may also help prevent more common forms of epilepsy caused by brain injury, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Scientists found that the FDA-approved drug rapamycin blocks brain changes believed to cause seizures in rats. In a paper last year, the same group showed that rapamycin prevents brain changes in mice triggered by one of the most common genetic causes of...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
Related