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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Sirtuin Stories

2011-01-28 00:16:42

The most common type of breast cancer in older women "” estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) positive breast cancer "” has been linked to a protein that fends off aging-related cellular damage. A new study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researcher David Gius, M.D., Ph.D., now shows how a deficiency in this aging-associated protein may set the stage for these tumors to develop. The findings, published in Molecular Cell, provide information that could assist in the...

2010-11-18 16:46:04

For decades, scientists have been searching for the fundamental biological secrets of how eating less extends lifespan. It has been well documented in species ranging from spiders to monkeys that a diet with consistently fewer calories can dramatically slow the process of aging and improve health in old age. But how a reduced diet acts at the most basic level to influence metabolism and physiology to blunt the age-related decline of tissues and cells has remained, for the most part, a...

2010-07-22 15:29:29

SIRT1 gene appears to control production of the devastating protein fragments MIT biologists report that they have discovered the first link between the amyloid plaques that form in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and a gene previously implicated in the aging process, SIRT1. The researchers found that SIRT1 appears to control production of the devastating protein fragments, termed A-beta peptides, that make up amyloid plaques. They also showed that in mice engineered to develop Alzheimer's...

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2010-07-12 06:45:00

According to a study published on Sunday, a gene linked to increased life span through calorie restriction also appears to play a critical role in boosting memory and brain power. Laboratory experiments have proven that a protein encoded by the SIRT1 gene can help slow the aging process in rodents. According to the new findings, the enzyme, which is known as Sirtuin1 in humans, seems to enhance memory and nerve-cell development in the brain as well. The researchers wrote in the journal...

2010-07-01 16:25:06

Better understanding of body's response to fasting may lead to therapies for metabolic disorders Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have found that an enzyme with several important roles in energy metabolism also helps to turn off the body's generation of fats and cholesterol under conditions of fasting. The report in Genes & Development describes how SIRT1, one of a group of enzymes called sirtuins, suppresses the activity of a family of proteins called SREBPs, which...

2010-05-11 13:00:22

Apoptosis, the natural 'programmed' death of cells, is arrested in the aftermath of strenuous exercise. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Physiology studied peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated from whole blood samples taken from people after finishing a marathon, finding that the balance between expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes is shifted after the race. Gabriella Marfe from the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' led a team of researchers who studied...

2010-04-29 07:59:00

VIENNA, April 29, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Can Resveratrol, the so-called miracle molecule found in red wine, peanuts and an obnoxious plant called Chinese Giant Knotweed, actually improve your brain function? Scientists at Northumbria University in the UK have just published a double-blind, peer-reviewed study in the journal, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, which concludes that a relatively modest dose of this compound in the form of one or two capsules may just do that. In...

2009-12-15 12:52:26

A new paper from MIT biology professor Leonard Guarente strengthens the link between longevity proteins called sirtuins and the lifespan-extending effects of calorie restriction. For decades, it has been known that cutting normal calorie consumption by 30 to 40 percent can boost lifespan and improve overall health in animals such as worms and mice. Guarente believes that those effects are controlled by sirtuins "” proteins that keep cells alive and healthy in the face of stress by...

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2009-10-15 07:55:00

A naturally produced molecule called resveratrol, found in the skin of red grapes, has been shown to lower insulin levels in mice when injected directly into the brain, even when the animals ate a high-fat diet. The findings from a new UT Southwestern Medical Center study suggest that when acting directly on certain proteins in the brain, resveratrol may offer some protection against diabetes. Prior research has shown that the compound exerts anti-diabetic actions when given orally to animals...

2009-10-06 11:43:04

Resveratrol, a molecule found in red grapes, has been shown to improve diabetes when delivered orally to rodents. Until now, however, little has been known about how these beneficial changes are mediated in the body. A new study accepted for publication in Endocrinology, a journal of The Endocrine Society, shows that the brain plays a key role in mediating resveratrol's anti-diabetic actions, potentially paving the way for future orally-delivered diabetes medications that target the brain....