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Latest Sliding filament model Stories

2013-12-17 04:20:03

Tokyo, Dec 17, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - Beginning with their discovery of spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) of muscle, Prof. Shin'ichi Ishiwata and his team at Waseda University's Faculty of Science and Engineering have been experimentally characterizing this phenomenon over the last 25 years. Recently, the team, in collaboration with Dr. Katsuhiko Sato of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology (Kobe) and Vice Director Yoshiki Kuramoto of the International Institute for Advanced...

2012-07-20 01:55:31

Max Planck scientists bring the basis of muscle movement into sharper focus Muscle contraction and many other movement processes are controlled by the interplay between myosin and actin filaments. Two further proteins, tropomyosin and troponin, regulate how myosin binds to actin. While theoretical models have in fact described exactly how these muscle proteins interact, this interaction has never previously been observed in detail. Stefan Raunser and Elmar Behrmann from the Max Planck...

2012-06-11 19:54:23

An actin-ratchet tightens the contractile ring that severs budding daughter cells from their yeast mothers During the final stage of cell division, a short-lived contractile ring constricts the cellular membrane and eventually separates the dividing cell in two. Although this "molecular muscle's" composition, mainly actin and myosin, is similar to its skeletal counterpart, the force-producing mechanism is fundamentally different, report researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical...

2012-04-03 11:33:42

Researchers from the Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Gothenburg have managed for the first time to obtain detailed information about the role of the protein metastasin in the spread of tumor cells. Published recently in the renowned Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study paves the way for the development of new drugs. Metastasin is a protein with a key role in the spread of tumor cells. Previous research has shown that it is...

2011-04-19 15:02:12

New insight into the physiology of cardiac muscle may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies that exploit an inherent protective state of the heart. The research, published by Cell Press online on April 19th in the Biophysical Journal, discovers a state of cardiac muscle that exhibits a low metabolic rate and may help to regulate energy use and promote efficiency in this hard-working and vital organ. Muscle cells are highly specialized cells that are able to physically contract and...

2011-02-15 19:44:22

New research sheds light on the interaction between the semi-flexible protein tropomyosin and actin thin filaments. The study, published by Cell Press on February 15th in the Biophysical Journal, provides the first detailed atomic model of tropomyosin bound to actin and significantly advances the understanding of the dynamic relationship between these key cellular proteins. Tropomyosin is a long protein that associates with actin, a highly conserved thin filament protein found in organisms...

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2008-04-10 14:20:00

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that a protein called leiomodin (Lmod) promotes the assembly of an important heart muscle protein called actin. What's more, Lmod directs the assembly of actin to form the pumping unit of the heart. The findings appear in this week's issue of Science."Very little was known about Lmod when we began this study," says lead author Roberto Dominguez, PhD, Associate Professor of Physiology. "It appeared that this...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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