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Latest Slime mold Stories

2014-04-04 11:46:23

University of Guelph researchers have unraveled some of the inner workings of slime produced by one of nature's most bizarre creatures – hagfish. They've learned how the super-strong and mega-long protein threads secreted by the eel-like animals are organized at the cellular level. Their research was published today in the science journal Nature Communications. The slime-making process has fascinated and perplexed biologists for more than 100 years, says lead author Prof. Douglas...

Slime Mold Gets Upper Hand By Cheating
2013-01-09 13:38:37

BioMed Central A 'cheater' mutation (chtB) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a free living slime mold able to co-operate as social organism when food is scarce, allows the cheater strain to exploit its social partner, finds a new study published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology. The mutation ensures that when mixed with 'normal' Dictyostelium more than the fair share of cheaters become spores, dispersing to a new environment, and avoiding dying as stalk cells....

Brainless Slime Mold Smarter Than You Think
2012-10-09 13:30:28

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Nothing sounds dumber than “Slime Mold.” This might even be one of the more demeaning insult in sophomoric lexicon, as nothing sounds worse. Yet, for all its off-putting properties, (the slime, the mold) this little organism is fascinating to scientists and researchers, studying how it is able to grow, move and expand. The makeup of slime mold is relatively simple: A community of single-celled spores which have...

2012-03-27 01:03:16

Queen´s University professor Selim Akl has provided additional proof to the theory that nature computes. Dr. Akl (School of Computing) placed rolled oats on a map of Canada, covering the major urban areas. One urban area held the slime mold. The slime mold reached out for the food, creating thin tubes that eventually formed a network mirroring the Canadian highway system. “By showing species as low as slime mold can compute a network as complex as the Canadian highway system,...

Image 1 - Close Family Ties Keep Microbial Cheaters In Check
2011-12-17 04:14:20

Experiments on "slime mold" explain why almost all multicellular organisms begin life as a single cell Any multicellular animal, from a blue whale to a human being, poses a special challenge for evolution. Most of the cells in its body will die without reproducing; only a privileged few will pass their genes to the next generation. How could the extreme degree of cooperation required by multicellular existence actually evolve? Why aren't all creatures unicellular individualists...

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2011-03-14 07:26:18

Cells at the tip of the slime mold's fruiting body organize into an epithelial layer and secrete proteins as do some animals cells The so-called cellular slime mold, a unicellular organism that may transition into a multicellular organism under stress, has just been found to have a tissue structure that was previously thought to exist only in more sophisticated animals. What's more, two proteins that are needed by the slime mold to form this structure are similar to those that perform the...

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2011-01-20 06:42:08

A species of amoeba -- Dictyostelium discoideum -- has shown primitive farming behavior as it travels along, according to a new study. In results of the study, reported Jan. 19 in the journal Nature, evolutionary biologists Joan Strassmann and David Queller of Rice University show that the social amoebae (commonly known as slime molds) increase their odds of survival through a rudimentary form of agriculture. Research by lead author Debra Brock, a graduate at Rice, found that some amoebae...

2010-05-27 16:42:27

Rice researchers find first to starve in slime mold thrive at others' expense Rice University evolutionary biologists reported in a paper published this week that the first cells to starve in a slime mold seem to have an advantage that not only helps them survive to reproduce, but also pushes those that keep on eating into sacrificing themselves for the common good. The paper by Rice graduate student Jennie Kuzdzal-Fick and her mentors, David Queller and Joan Strassmann, Rice's Harry C. and...

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2010-01-22 08:50:13

The efficient methods of a slime mold could inform human engineers What could human engineers possibly learn from the lowly slime mold? Reliable, cost-efficient network construction, apparently: a recent experiment suggests that Physarum polycephalum, a gelatinous fungus-like mold, might actually lead the way to improved technological systems, such as more robust computer and mobile communication networks. This revelation comes after a team of Japanese and British researchers observed that...


Latest Slime mold Reference Libraries

0_127790463bfb38d3bcb5bac0ab4ce0f0
2009-01-20 20:31:33

The Pacific Hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) also known as the Slime Eel, is a species of hagfish that is found in the mesopelagic (600 to 3000 feet deep) to abyssal (13,000 to 21,000 feet deep) Pacific ocean, near the ocean floor. In many parts of the world, including the USA, hagfish-skin clothing, belts, and other accessories are advertised and sold as "yuppie leather" or "eel-skin". Hagfish, however, are not true eels. This is a jawless fish, as it evolved to lose this trait from the early...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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