Quantcast

Latest Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Stories

New Poison Dart Frog Species Discovered In Donoso, Panama
2014-09-29 03:12:01

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute A bright orange poison dart frog with a unique call was discovered in Donoso, Panama, and described by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí, both in Panama, and the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia. In the species description published this week in Zootaxa, it was named Andinobates geminisae for Geminis Vargas, "the beloved wife of [coauthor] Marcos Ponce, for her unconditional...

2014-08-29 23:04:15

Other Notable Experts – from the Smithsonian to the International Space Station – Take Attendees to Deep Sea and Space Kansas City, Missouri (PRWEB) August 29, 2014 The Linda Hall Library Fall Lecture Series will transport attendees to the Panama Canal, tropical reefs and outer space, educating and entertaining along the way. As the world's foremost independent research library devoted to science, engineering and technology, the Library has secured such notable speakers as double...

2014-03-05 23:21:26

Library opens Panama Canal exhibition April 8; announces year-long centennial programs and lecture series, including Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian David McCullough. A working scale model of a canal lock—created in partnership with graduate students at the UMKC School of Computing and Engineering—will be displayed on the Library’s front lawn Kansas City, MO (PRWEB) March 05, 2014 The Linda Hall Library— the world's foremost independent research library devoted to...

2014-02-07 13:25:47

Mexico is the fourth largest honey producer and fifth largest honey exporter in the world. A Smithsonian researcher and colleagues helped rural farmers in Mexico to quantify the genetically modified organism (GMO) soybean pollen in honey samples rejected for sale in Germany. Their results will appear Feb. 7 in the online journal, Scientific Reports. David Roubik, senior staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and colleagues developed the ability to identify pollen...

New Coral Species Discovered In Peruvian Pacific
2014-02-04 05:19:13

[ Watch the Video: New Species Of Soft Coral ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and the University of Costa Rica have apparently discovered a new, fiery-red species of coral in the shallow waters of the Peruvian Pacific. The new species has been named Psammogorgia hookeri in honor of Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University biologist Yuri Hooker, and according to the authors of a paper in the...

Ripple Effect Used By Bats When Hunting Frogs During Mating Season
2014-01-24 12:56:12

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As male túngara frogs call from their puddles to attract females, they create ripples that spread across the water. According to researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama, these ripples are used by other male frogs to assess their competition – and also by bats looking for their next meal. If it sees a bat flying overhead, a male túngara will stop calling – yet ripples continue moving for several...

New Evidence Sponge Effect Tropical Forests
2013-12-18 15:31:48

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research on tropical forests is adding more evidence to a controversial phenomenon known as the 'sponge effect.' Teachers working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama found tropical forests soak up water during storms and release stored water during droughts, which is known as the sponge effect. This phenomenon is at the center of a debate about how to minimize flood damage and maximize water availability in the...

Rodents In The Rainforest Risk Their Lives To Eat
2013-12-18 12:22:08

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Hungry rodents that wake up early are much more likely to be eaten than rodents getting plenty of food and shut-eye, according to new results from a study at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. The study was published in the journal Animal Behavior, early online edition, Dec., 2013. Scientists equipped agoutis, common rainforest rodents, and ocelots, their feline predators, with radio collars and tracked them 24/7 via an...

Young Tropical Forests Contribute Little To Tree-Biodiversity Conservation
2013-12-12 17:14:28

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute A satellite image of a green swath of tropical forest does not tell the whole story. About half the world's tropical forests are relatively young. Unless protected, they are unlikely to last more than a human generation before falling to bulldozers and chainsaws. These ephemeral secondary forests may contribute little to tree-biodiversity conservation, according to a new report by scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama....

First High-resolution National Carbon Map Of Panama
2013-07-23 11:11:56

Carnegie Institution A team of researchers has for the first time mapped the above ground carbon density of an entire country in high fidelity. They integrated field data with satellite imagery and high-resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to map the vegetation and to quantify carbon stocks throughout the Republic of Panama. The results are the first maps that report carbon stocks locally in areas as small as a hectare (2.5 acres) and yet cover millions of hectares...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
Related