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Latest Smooth muscle Stories

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2012-08-01 17:46:10

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Cold feet are often equated to cowardice or second-thoughts when it comes to making a life-changing decision, such as going through with a marriage. Cold feet can also be more than just a joke people tell to be folksy. In fact, many people complain about their cold feet or the cold feet of a partner. Now, some physiologists have set their brains about figuring out why some people constantly have cold feet, saying a biological mechanism...

2012-06-06 21:39:11

One of the top suspects behind killer vascular diseases is the victim of mistaken identity, according to researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, who used genetic tracing to help hunt down the real culprit. The guilty party is not the smooth muscle cells within blood vessel walls, which for decades was thought to combine with cholesterol and fat that can clog arteries. Blocked vessels can eventually lead to heart attacks and strokes, which account for one in three deaths in...

2012-04-03 11:33:42

Researchers from the Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Gothenburg have managed for the first time to obtain detailed information about the role of the protein metastasin in the spread of tumor cells. Published recently in the renowned Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study paves the way for the development of new drugs. Metastasin is a protein with a key role in the spread of tumor cells. Previous research has shown that it is...

2012-01-26 04:20:01

A*STAR scholar Ms Christine Cheung first author of team paper published this month in Nature Biotechnology*Singapore, Jan 26, 2012 - (ACN Newswire) - A Cambridge University research team has for the first time discovered a method of generating different types of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) - the cells which make up the walls of blood vessels - using cells from patients' skin. This work could lead to new treatments and better screening for cardiovascular disease.Cardiovascular disease...

2011-12-21 13:07:40

New research hopes to explain premature births and failed inductions of labor. The study by academics at the University of Bristol suggests a new mechanism by which the level of myosin phosphorylation is regulated in the pregnant uterus. The researchers, Dr Claire Hudson and Professor Andrés López Bernal in the School of Clinical Sciences and Dr Kate Heesom in the University Proteomics Facility and the School of Biochemistry, have discovered that phosphorylation...

2011-11-10 08:00:00

The EurekaMag Science Magazine has just been featured on a video available at the website's homepage and at YouTube. It has also published a new review on RhoA (ras homolog gene family, member A) which is a GTPase protein regulating a signal transduction pathway linking plasma membrane receptors to the assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. (PRWEB) November 10, 2011 The Video on EurekaMag.com which has just been uploaded to YouTube focuses on the website's vast library of...

2011-10-31 23:29:11

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have discovered that the infiltration of white blood cells into an expectant mother´s blood vessels may explain high blood pressure in pregnancy. The findings could lead to novel avenues of treatment for pregnant women with preeclampsia based on regulation of white blood cells called neutrophilis, their products or their cellular effects. Preeclampsia is one of the most significant health problems in pregnancy and a...

2011-10-03 14:14:12

Research at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine could help lead to new ways to prevent coronary arteries from reclogging after balloon angioplasties. The latest in a series of studies in this effort is published online ahead of print in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, a journal of the American Heart Association. Senior author is Allen M. Samarel, MD, and first author is Yevgeniya E. Koshman, PhD. In an angioplasty, a tiny balloon is inflated to open a...

2011-08-30 11:12:55

A gene that governs the flow of potassium in and out of cells in blood vessels could provide a new avenue for controlling blood pressure, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in a report in the current issue of the journal Hypertension. The gene, known as K2P6.1 or TWIK-2, is one of a family of potassium channel genes first discovered in the 1990s. In general, ion channels are tiny pores that, when opened, allow charged ions such as sodium, potassium or calcium to flow in and...

2011-04-19 15:02:12

New insight into the physiology of cardiac muscle may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies that exploit an inherent protective state of the heart. The research, published by Cell Press online on April 19th in the Biophysical Journal, discovers a state of cardiac muscle that exhibits a low metabolic rate and may help to regulate energy use and promote efficiency in this hard-working and vital organ. Muscle cells are highly specialized cells that are able to physically contract and...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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