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How Does The Bite Of A Small Texas Snake Cause Extreme Pain?
2011-11-17 14:12:42

Examining venom from a variety of poisonous snakes, a group of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco has discovered why the bite of one small black, yellow and red serpent called the Texas coral snake can be so painful. The finding offers insights into chronic and acute pain — and provides new research tools that may help pharmaceutical companies design drugs to combat pain. The venom contains a toxic mixture of chemicals that includes two special proteins...

Pythons’ Huge Hearts Offer Insight For Human Heart Health
2011-10-28 05:34:09

While many people think of snakes as creepy, cold-hearted creatures that swallow their prey whole. But it turns out the reptiles actually have enormous hearts that could offer clues to treating people with cardiac disease, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder reported on Thursday. The surprising new study showed that the vast amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding Burmese pythons promote healthy heart growth. The researchers found the amount of...

2011-10-27 22:12:55

Identification of three fatty acids involved in the extreme growth of Burmese pythons' hearts following large meals could prove beneficial in treating diseased human hearts, according to research co-authored by a University of Alabama scientist and publishing in the Oct. 28 issue of Science. Growth of the human heart can be beneficial when resulting from exercise — a type of growth known as physiological cardiac hypertrophy — but damaging when triggered by disease —...

2011-10-27 22:06:29

Fatty acids circulating through feeding python bloodstreams promotes healthy heart growth in the constricting snakes A surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth, results that may have implications for treating human heart disease. CU-Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand and her research team found the amount of triglycerides -- the main constituent of natural...

Image 1 - New Ancient Crocodile Named
2011-09-15 12:48:29

  Did an ancient crocodile relative give the world's largest snake a run for its money? In a new study appearing Sept. 15 in the journal Palaeontology, University of Florida researchers describe a new 20-foot extinct species discovered in the same Colombian coal mine with Titanoboa, the world's largest snake. The findings help scientists better understand the diversity of animals that occupied the oldest known rainforest ecosystem, which had higher temperatures than today, and could...

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2011-07-19 09:44:15

Marsupials that prey on venomous snakes also evolve rapidly Research published recently in PLoS One delivers new insight about rapid toxin evolution in venomous snakes: pitvipers such as rattlesnakes may be engaged in an arms race with opossums, a group of snake-eating American marsupials. Although some mammals have long been known to eat venomous snakes, this fact has not been factored into previous explanations for the rapid evolution of snake venom. Instead, snake venom is usually seen as...

2011-06-30 17:47:41

A new low-cost snake antivenom could empower countries such as Papua New Guinea to produce their own antivenoms, putting an end to chronic antivenom shortages and unnecessary deaths. Researchers from the Australian Venom Research Unit (AVRU) at the University of Melbourne have collaborated with scientists from the University of Papua New Guinea and the University of Costa Rica, to develop new antivenom against the lethal Papuan taipan. The preclinical studies of this antivenom have been...

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2011-06-27 05:45:00

Researchers in Australia have found that a chemical compound typically used on heart patients may raise chances of survival for snakebite victims. The study, published in Nature Medicine, claims chemical nitric oxide can slow down, by as much as 50 percent, the time it takes for snake venom to enter the bloodstream allowing time for victims to seek medical help, said lead author Dirk van Helden, professor at the School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle in Australia. Reuters...

2011-05-31 15:45:03

A popular "get well" card shows a raccoon saying to a snake, "You wouldn't get these stomach aches if you chewed your food properly."  Vets know, however, that indigestion in snakes and other reptiles often results not from swallowing food whole but from a parasitic infection.  The gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis represents a particularly severe problem:  although it is rarely otherwise serious in mammals, reptiles seem especially prone to it and the condition is...

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2011-05-20 12:16:32

Until a recent discovery, theories about the origins and evolutionary relationships of snakes barely had a leg to stand on.Genetic studies suggest that snakes are related to monitor lizards and iguanas, while their anatomy points to amphisbaenians ("worm lizards"), a group of burrowing lizards with snake-like bodies. The debate has been unresolved--until now. The recent discovery by researchers from the University of Toronto Mississauga and the Museum fr Naturkunde Berlin, Germany of a tiny,...


Latest Snake Reference Libraries

Scarlet Snake, Cemophora coccinea
2014-01-17 10:16:15

The Scarlet snake (Cemophora coccinea) is a member of the Columbrae family. They are found only in the United States, in: southeastern Texas, eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. The species typically inhabits oak and pine forests with sandy soil good for burrowing. The Scarlet snake only grows to lengths of approximately 14-26 inches. Commonly...

Indian Gamma Snake, Boiga trigonata
2014-01-17 10:01:59

The Indian gamma snake (Boiga trigonata) may also be referred to as the common cat snake. The species, a member of the Colubridae family, ranges throughout Sri Lanka, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, southern Turkmenistan, southern Uzbekistan, southeastern Tajikistan, and Iran. Due to the vast areas the snake is found, habitats vary greatly from gallery forests to sparse desert shrublands. The Indian gamma snake has a yellow, olive or pale grayish coloration. A white zigzag...

Rosy Boa, Lichanura trivirgata
2014-01-17 09:41:32

The Rosy boa (Lichanura trivirgata) is commonly found throughout the southwestern areas of The United States, but may be found in parts of northwestern Mexico as well. A member of the Boidae family, the Rosy boa inhabits coastal desert canyons, rocky, desert slopes, creek-beds, and hillsides with large boulders. The Rosy boa is commonly fully grown measuring just over 3 feet. The species ranges in color from a yellowish, to tan or slate grey and 3 varying types of stripes run the length of...

Southern Smooth Snake, Coronella girondica
2014-01-17 09:24:19

The Southern smooth snake or Riccioli’s snake (Coronella girondica) is a member of the Colubridae family typically found in Southern Europe and northern Africa. The species range Europe, from Portugal and Spain, the south of France, Monaco and parts of Italy. In Africa, the mountains of Morocco, parts of Algeria to Tunisia are common ranges. Habitats vary from scrubland, woodlands, grasslands, rocky areas or plantations. The species faces threats of habitat destruction and loss mostly...

Yellow Anaconda, Eunectes notaeus
2014-01-10 21:40:31

The Eunectes notaeus is a nonvenomous anaconda commonly known as the yellow anaconda. It is exclusively found in South America. The yellow anaconda is named for its ability to swim and their dorsal scales are larger and in fewer rows. Its habitat is made up of swamps, marshes, and slow-moving streams and rivers. The species is also beginning to invade the Florida Everglades. Prey usually includes birds, fish, turtles, lizards, bird’s eggs, small mammals and the decaying fish flesh. The...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.