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Latest Snowball Earth Stories

Research Provides New Insight Into Snowball Earth Duration
2013-02-28 21:17:15

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online About 635 million years ago, our world was covered in ice during an event called "Snowball Earth," and new details written in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences provide new insight on the duration of this event. According to the Snowball Earth hypothesis, an ice age brought on rapid changes in the atmospheric conditions on our planet, followed by a rapid greenhouse heat wave. This period may have given rise to...

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2012-11-16 11:46:39

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to an international team of scientists, led by the University of Durham, UK, the recent storms that have battered the east coast of America may have been much more frequent in the region 450 million years ago. The findings of their study, published in the journal Geology, pinpoint the positions of the Equator and the landmasses of the USA, Canada and Greenland, during the Ordovician Period 450 million years ago,...

Early Evolution Linked To Climate Change And Oxygen Levels
2012-09-28 11:50:55

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Geochemists from the University of California, Riverside teamed up with an international team of scientists to uncover new evidence linking together extreme climate change, elevation of oxygen levels and early animal evolution. Scientists have long speculated that a dramatic rise in atmospheric oxygen levels was the trigger for early animal evolution. The direct cause-and-effect relationships between environmental and animal...

2012-01-27 10:44:18

University of Miami study offers new geochemical clues to understand conditions just prior to major climatic event In a study published in the journal Geology, scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science suggest that the large changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates which occurred prior to the major climatic event more than 500 million years ago, known as 'Snowball Earth,' are unrelated to worldwide glacial events. "Our...

How Could Life have Survived 'Snowball Earth'
2011-10-11 08:36:07

Global glaciation likely put a chill on life on Earth hundreds of millions of years ago, but new research indicates that simple life in the form of photosynthetic algae could have survived in a narrow body of water with characteristics similar to today's Red Sea. "Under those frigid conditions, there are not a lot of places where you would expect liquid water and light to occur in the same area, and you need both of those things for photosynthetic algae to survive," said Adam Campbell, a...

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2011-06-16 05:30:00

According to MIT researchers, new fossils suggest life had a rapid recovery after a global freeze. Researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Smith College discovered hundreds of microscopic fossils in rocks dating back about 710 million years, which is around the time frame that the planet emerged from the "Snowball Earth" event. The team said new fossils are remnants of tiny organisms that survived the harsh post-glacial environment by building armor and reaching out with microscopic...

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2011-05-26 14:08:53

Finds that rocks used as key geologic evidence were formed deep within Earth millions of years after the ice age ended There's a theory about how the Marinoan ice age"”also known as the "Snowball Earth" ice age because of its extreme low temperatures"”came to an abrupt end some 600 million years ago. It has to do with large amounts of methane, a strong greenhouse gas, bubbling up through ocean sediments and from beneath the permafrost and heating the atmosphere. The main physical...

2011-01-20 00:00:49

Grayling Industries provides IBC liners to help scientists simulate "Snowball Earth". Alpharetta, GA (PRWEB) January 18, 2011 Snowball Earth is what climate researchers call a period in Earths history that occurred approximately 600 million years ago when the planet may have been covered in ice from the poles to the equator. Dr. Bonnie Light is a Physicist IV and Affiliate Assistant Professor who is currently working on a project to study one aspect of the physics of sea ice pertinent to...

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2010-12-15 05:35:00

Researchers in Britain and Australia have discovered evidence that parts of the open ocean may have experienced a catastrophic global freeze some 700 million years ago, which nearly wiped out life on Earth. The event, dubbed "Snowball Earth", created such turbulent seas that microorganisms barely survived, and created conditions so harsh that most life is believed to have perished, the scientists said. The researchers claim to have found deposits in the remote Flinders Ranges in South...

2010-11-01 09:30:31

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A team of scientists have discovered that evidence linking the "Snowball Earth" glacial events to the emergence of complex life. The Snowball Earth hypothesis states that the Earth was covered from pole to pole by a thick sheet of ice lasting, on several occasions, for millions of years. These glaciations were the most severe in Earth history. They occurred 750 to 580 million years ago. The researchers argue that the oceans in the aftermath of these events were rich in...


Latest Snowball Earth Reference Libraries

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:10:56

The Neoproterozoic is the third of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 1 billion years ago to 542 million years ago). This terminal era of the Proterozoic is itself divided into three sub-periods called the Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran Periods. The most severe glaciation known in the geologic record occurred during the Cryogenian Period, when ice sheets reached the equator and formed a possible “Snowball Earth.” And the earliest fossils of multi-cellular life...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.