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Latest Snowmelt Stories

Where Did Our Winters Go?
2012-12-04 14:19:49

National Science Foundation Changes in winter hydrology, ecology and biogeochemistry are focus of session at American Geophysical Union (AGU) conference If you're planning to skate on a frozen lake or river this winter, ski on a snowy slope, or, when spring arrives, depend on snowmelt to refill your water supply, you may need to think twice. Winter as a "species" may have evolved to be less like the winters we remember. The change has consequences for summer, too, including plants'...

A Tree In The Sierra Nevada
2012-08-08 10:29:40

A coniferous view of the link between snowmelt and water supplies in the U.S. West The following is part two in a series on the National Science Foundation's Critical Zone Observatories (CZO). Part one describes the work of the Susquehanna Shale Hills CZO. White fir, ponderosa pine, Jeffrey pine. Sugar pine, incense cedar, red fir: These are conifers of the headwater ecosystems of California's Sierra Nevada. If trees could talk, what tales they might tell of the health of the...

2011-06-28 11:00:00

PAGE, Ariz., June 28, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Summer visitors to Lake Powell will experience water levels last seen ten years ago, according to a new report by the Bureau of Reclamation. The report predicts water levels to be 3,665 feet above sea level by mid-August, a level not seen since 2001. In the last two months, the nation's second largest man-made lake has added 28 feet of water elevation with half of the snowpack still left to melt. This excess snowmelt is creating more areas to...

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2011-06-10 09:59:08

Researchers see increase in snowpack under bare dead pine trees, earlier melt under dead trees with red needles A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates the infestation of trees by mountain pine beetles in the high country across the West could potentially trigger earlier snowmelt and increase water yields from snowpack that accumulates beneath affected trees. Led by CU-Boulder geological sciences department doctoral student Evan Pugh, the study was undertaken near Grand Lake,...

2011-03-03 23:32:46

Polluted snow causes early runoff, stronger monsoons in Asia In some cases, soot "“ the fine, black carbon silt that is released from stoves, cars and manufacturing plants "“ can pack more of a climatic punch than greenhouse gases, according to a paper published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the University of Michigan and NOAA found that soot landing on snow on the massive Tibetan...

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2010-09-21 08:25:00

Snowmelt in the Colorado River basin is occurring earlier, reducing runoff and the amount of crucial water available downstream. A new study shows this is due to increased dust caused by human activities in the region during the past 150 years. The study, led by a NASA scientist and funded by the agency and the National Science Foundation, showed peak spring runoff now comes three weeks earlier than before the region was settled and soils were disturbed. Annual runoff is lower by more than...

2010-09-20 14:47:00

WASHINGTON, Sept. 20 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Snow melt in the Colorado River basin is occurring earlier, reducing runoff and the amount of crucial water available downstream. A new study shows this is due to increased dust caused by human activities in the region during the past 150 years. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The study, led by a NASA scientist and funded by the agency and the...

2010-03-04 12:00:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., March 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania Environmental Protection Secretary John Hanger said today that New York City has stepped up the amount of water it releases from its reservoirs to reduce the threat of flooding from the historic snowpack throughout the upper Delaware River basin. This action is one of several new flood-mitigation measures established under a cooperative agreement between New York City and states along the Delaware River. The city controls...

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2008-10-09 08:27:06

The northern part of the Greenland ice sheet experienced extreme snowmelt during the summer of 2008, with large portions of the area subject to record melting days, according to Dr. Marco Tedesco, Assistant Professor of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at The City College of New York (CCNY), and colleagues.  Their conclusion is based on an analysis of microwave brightness temperature recorded by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard the F13 satellite. "Having such extreme...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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