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Latest Snuppy Stories

2005-12-03 21:59:54

By Jon Herskovitz SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea's pioneering stem cell scientist has been in seclusion since he spoke of ethical lapses in procuring human eggs, but with national pride and global science at stake, the affair shows little sign of dying down. Hwang Woo-suk, the scientist who brought South Korea to the global forefront of stem cell and cloning research, has sought solace at a Buddhist temple after apologizing on November 24 for those lapses in his work, according to...

2005-11-24 03:00:00

By Jon Herskovitz and Lee Jin-joo SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea's pioneering stem cell scientist apologized on Thursday that two members of his team had donated their egg cells for research, saying his rush to advance science may have clouded his ethical judgment. Hwang Woo-suk, who became a hero in South Korea after major developments in cloning research, has been caught in a swirl of allegations over his work after a U.S. collaborator left the group, saying Hwang unethically procured human...

2005-11-23 21:59:27

SEOUL (Reuters) - A pioneering South Korean stem cell scientist was aware that two members of his team donated their egg cells to advance his research, but this did not represent a breach in ethics, a health ministry report said on Thursday. Hwang Woo-suk, who has become a hero in South Korea after two major developments in cloning research, has been caught in a swirl of allegations over his work after a U.S. collaborator quit the group, accusing Hwang of unethically procuring human...

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2005-11-23 06:58:25

SEOUL, South Korea -- South Korean cloning pioneer Hwang Woo-suk said in a television interview that he tried to talk junior scientists at his lab out of donating their own eggs for research, responding to the latest allegations over ethics violations that have plunged his groundbreaking work into controversy. In the report late Tuesday, the MBC television network also said it obtained documents from Hwang's lab showing possibly hundreds of human eggs had been bought for Hwang's research. The...

2005-11-22 20:06:28

By Jon Herskovitz SEOUL (Reuters) - Everything seemed so bright for pioneering South Korean stem cell scientist Hwang Woo-suk just a few weeks ago after two major breakthroughs this year. Now the man who made world headlines by cloning a dog faces a swirl of allegations over the ethics of his team's work. The Seoul National University scientist is a hero in South Korea, where postage stamps have been commissioned depicting the hopes of his research, a man rising from a wheelchair and...

2005-11-14 04:55:00

SEOUL -- A pioneering South Korean stem-cell scientist said on Monday that his work met strict government guidelines on ethics, including on human egg donations, after a top U.S. scientist suspended collaboration. Professor Woo-Suk Hwang of Seoul National University did not comment directly on the move by Gerald Schatten of the University of Pittsburgh to halt his work with Hwang, citing possible irregularities recruiting egg donors. "We are the only research team (in South Korea) with the...

2005-11-13 10:20:30

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Snuppy, the first cloned dog, is the most amazing invention of 2005, Time magazine said on Sunday. The puppy, a 5-month-old Afghan hound, was cloned at Seoul National University in Korea by a 45-person team led by Professor Woo Suk Hwang. Snuppy's genes are derived from a single cell taken from the ear of an adult Afghan, rather than the egg and sperm of a mother and father, Time said. The technique used to create Snuppy, somatic nuclear cell transfer, was the...

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2005-11-13 07:05:00

NEW YORK -- Snuppy, the first cloned dog, is the most amazing invention of 2005, Time magazine said on Sunday. The puppy, a 5-month-old Afghan hound, was cloned at Seoul National University in Korea by a 45-person team led by Professor Woo Suk Hwang. Snuppy's genes are derived from a single cell taken from the ear of an adult Afghan, rather than the egg and sperm of a mother and father, Time said. The technique used to create Snuppy, somatic nuclear cell transfer, was the same technique...

2005-10-19 06:33:11

By Edward Davies and Jack Kim SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea launched on Wednesday a an ambitious project to make the country a global hub for stem-cell storage and research, hoping to further cement its status at the forefront of cloning research. Helped by generous government support and an absence of some of the red-tape and ethical debate that has hampered research in countries such as the United States, South Korea is fast becoming a key center for stem-cell research. Stem cells...

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2005-08-06 10:38:19

But the benefits will take time to realize, experts predict The announcement this week that South Korean researchers have created the world's first cloned dog is being hailed as a scientific marvel, but one without immediate medical benefits -- for dogs or humans. And although the canine genome is far more complex than any other animal cloned to date, it doesn't bring the world closer to the ethically and emotionally charged possibility of cloning a human, experts said. Yet the breakthrough...