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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 13:20 EDT

Latest Social determinants of health Stories

2008-08-29 00:00:36

By James Macintyre People are dying "on a grand scale" around the world because of social injustice brought about by a "toxic" combination of bad policies, politics and economics, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said yesterday. Avoidable health problems caused by social factors - as opposed to biology and genetics - are causing large-scale health inequalities in the UK, the WHO's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health has found after a three-year study. Evidence showed that...

2008-08-28 15:01:07

Social injustice is killing people on a grand scale, said the World Health Organization's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health in Switzerland. A three-year investigation by the WHO's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health was presented Thursday to WHO Director General Dr. Margaret Chan. "(The) toxic combination of bad policies, economics and politics is, in large measure responsible for the fact that a majority of people in the world do not enjoy the good health that...

2008-08-27 03:00:24

By Anonymous Access Annual Meeting online program now and plan ahead SIR Michael Marmot, an internationally recognized leader on health inequalities, will be the keynote speaker at APHA's 136th Annual Meeting in San Diego, the Association announced in June. Marmot, PhD, MPH, MBBS, FRCP, FFPHM, FMedSci, will speak during this year's opening session, which will take place Sunday, Oct. 26, from noon to 2 p.m. Marmot is chair of the World Health Organization's Commission on Social...

2008-07-31 03:00:20

By Lundgren, Bernt Abstract: A comprehensive Swedish public health policy was adopted by the Swedish Parliament, the Riksdag, in April 2003. It pushes health up on the political agenda and affords equity in health high priority. The first phase of implementation of the policy, 2003-5, is described in the 2005 Public Health Policy Report published by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health (SNIPH). For the purpose of investigating the implementation, SNIPH has monitored the...

2008-06-25 00:01:33

Ministers of health, experts and more than 500 delegates from 53 countries are meeting in Estonia, to discuss the relationship between health and wealth. The delegates from the World Health Organization European Region are meeting in Tallinn, Estonia, at the WHO European Ministerial Conference on Health Systems: Health Systems, Health and Wealth. Between 1970 and 2003 in the western part of the region, increases in life expectancy were worth 29 percent to 38 percent of gross domestic...

2008-03-10 09:00:20

By Lee, Albert Fu, Hua; Chenyi, Ji Abstract: China has the world's largest population. In the past, the public health system in mainland China has been strongly influenced by the former Soviet Union. Hong Kong and Macao, the Special Administrative Regions (SAR), have been under colonial administration adopting a laisser-faire approach to health policy. Over the most recent decades, mainland China and the two SARs have adopted the Ottawa Charter principles and re-orientated the healthcare...

2006-05-05 09:46:43

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A serious illness or death in the family may take a greater toll on women's health than men's, research findings suggest. In a study of more than 27,000 adults in Finland, researchers found that women were more likely than men to report health problems after a close relative fell ill or died. And among all adults who reported such health effects, women typically took longer to recover. "Our findings suggest that women are more vulnerable...

2005-12-13 12:10:00

By Jon Hurdle PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) - Improvement in the overall health of Americans has stalled in the last five years as more people became obese and fewer quit smoking, according to a report released on Monday. The America's Health Rankings report, issued at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting, showed that 23.1 percent of the U.S. population is now considered obese, more than twice the level in 1990. It also found that while the number of smokers has fallen by almost a...

2005-12-13 07:00:00

By Jon Hurdle PHILADELPHIA -- Improvement in the overall health of Americans has stalled in the last five years as more people became obese and fewer quit smoking, according to a report released on Monday. The America's Health Rankings report, issued at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting, showed that 23.1 percent of the U.S. population is now considered obese, more than twice the level in 1990. It also found that while the number of smokers has fallen by almost a third...

2005-12-12 18:00:00

By Jon Hurdle PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) - Improvement in the overall health of Americans has stalled in the last five years as more people became obese and fewer quit smoking, according to a report released on Monday. The America's Health Rankings report, issued at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting, showed that 23.1 percent of the U.S. population is now considered obese, more than twice the level in 1990. It also found that while the number of smokers has fallen by almost a...