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Latest Social exclusion Stories

2013-08-02 11:18:46

Social isolation may make some people more susceptible to unfair marketing practices People who feel isolated are more inclined to make riskier financial decisions for bigger payoffs, according to new research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 121st Annual Convention. In a presentation entitled "Effects of Social Exclusion on Financial Risk-Taking," Rod Duclos, PhD, assistant professor of marketing at the Hong Kong University of Science and...

2013-01-28 19:45:55

In today´s society, there is a significant imbalance in the function of the care of the elderly. While the population ages more and more, the social mechanisms set up to perform the care function of the elderly are unable to meet this demand. Today, the mechanisms correspond to four spheres: the family, the welfare state, the market of private institutions, and the so-called community sphere. “Why has this imbalance come about?” As Etxezarreta explains, “at a given...

2012-12-05 12:56:19

The study, by IIASA Evolution and Ecology Program postdoctoral fellow Tatsuya Sasaki, provides a simple new model that ties punishment by social exclusion to the benefits for the punisher. It may help explain how social exclusion arose in evolution, and how it promotes cooperation among groups. "Punishment is a common tool to promote cooperation in the real world," says Sasaki. "And social exclusion is a common way to do it." From reef fish to chimpanzees, there are many examples of...

2011-12-14 10:17:04

Older people and those who work non-standard hours are less likely to feel integrated into society, according to a study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). "Feeling part of society usually involves participating in certain activities such as sports, the arts, volunteering or social networking," says Dr Matt Barnes who led the research. "Our research shows that older people and those who work unusual hours face particular barriers to participating in such...

2011-09-19 20:34:12

Current policy pressures on universities to focus on improving their research excellence and to widen participation make it hard for them to engage meaningfully with excluded communities, according to research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). University-community engagement remains marginal to the organisation, funding, management and strategic control of universities. This reduces their benefits for excluded communities. "Traditionally, universities have regarded...

2011-02-24 19:12:28

Many studies have suggested that males tend to be more physically and verbally aggressive than females. According to a new study, to be published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, it may not be the case that women are less competitive than men"”they may just be using a different strategy to come out ahead. Specifically, women may rely more on indirect forms of aggression, such as social exclusion. To investigate how men and women respond...

2010-09-20 22:59:29

People who feel excluded will go to any length to try to become part of a group, even if it involves spending large sums of cash, eating something dicey, or doing illicit drugs, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. "Social exclusion prompts people to use money and consumption in the service of affiliation," write authors Nicole L. Mead (Tilburg University), Roy F. Baumeister (Florida State University), Tyler F. Stillman (Southern Utah University), Catherine D. Rawn...

2010-02-03 13:43:04

New research published in Critical Social Policy UK programs designed to help the unemployed get back to work and support young parents are losing impact because they are not designed with the participants' gender in mind. Men as well as women can lose out as a result of 'gender blind' policies. This finding, based on two case studies in the North East of England, appears in Critical Social Policy this week, published by SAGE. The paper, 'Striking out': Shifting labor markets, welfare to work...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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