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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 12:45 EDT

Latest Social inequality Stories

2012-04-18 13:34:49

New research published today in the journal Age and Aging has investigated why women are 40% more likely to be admitted in to a care home than men. The study found that women were often married to older partners who cannot provide care for them due to their age-related frailty. The study, entitled 'Gender differences in care home admission risk: Partner's age explains the higher risk for women', used data from the Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS) derived from the Northern Ireland...

2012-04-18 10:54:12

In a novel study of health disparities in the United States, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have identified 22 socioeconomic and environmental variables that together are better indicators of early death than are race or geography. The findings upend long-held beliefs that where you live and the color of your skin are the best markers for how long you may live. The innovative analysis shows that when factors related to local social conditions – including...

2012-02-22 12:26:47

Highly educated Asians as likely to engage in negative stereotyping as less-educated peers Highly educated whites and minorities are no more likely to support workplace affirmative action programs than are their less educated peers, according to a new study in the March issue of Social Psychology Quarterly, which casts some doubt on the view that an advanced education is profoundly transformative when it comes to racial attitudes. "I think this study is important because there's a...

2012-02-14 11:50:36

Partners provide a vital source of positive emotional support for the vast majority of people in the UK. Nine out of ten people who were married or cohabiting talk to their partner about their worries, according to data from Understanding Society, the world´s largest longitudinal household study of 40,000 UK households. Ninety four per cent of those surveyed rely on their partner for support when a problem crops up. As part of the Understanding Society study of 40,000 UK households,...

2011-10-27 14:10:01

Exposure to television coverage of terrorism causes women to lose psychological resources much more than men, which leads to negative feelings and moodiness. This has been shown in a new study, conducted at the University of Haifa and soon to be published in Anxiety, Stress & Coping, that examined the differences between men and women in a controlled experiment environment. An earlier study conducted by Prof. Moshe Zeidner of the Department of Counseling and Human Development at the...

Assets Increase Incidence of Marriage
2011-10-07 04:51:23

A new study published in the American Journal of Sociology indicates that the incidence of marriage drops when people have no personal wealth such as a car or financial assets. The study shows that in the past few decades Americans are getting married when they are older and may forego marriage altogether. Statistics in the study indicate that between 1970 and 2000 the median age of first marriage rose by four years and the percentage of unmarrieds increased from 5 percent to 10 percent....

2011-09-27 14:23:53

Stereotypes and status symbols impact if a face is viewed as black or white An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Tufts University, Stanford University and the University of California, Irvine has found that the perception of race can be altered by cues to social status as simple as the clothes a person wears. Far from being a straightforward "read out" of facial features, say the researchers, racial categorization represents a complex and subtle process powerfully shaped by...

2011-06-30 17:39:27

Research sheds light on the well-documented 'other-race effect' Northwestern University researchers have provided new biological evidence suggesting that the brain works differently when memorizing the face of a person from one's own race than when memorizing a face from another race. Their study -- which used EEG recordings to measure brain activity -- sheds light on a well-documented phenomenon known as the "other-race effect." One of the most replicated psychology findings, the other-race...

2011-06-02 13:35:40

Study finds racial-ethnic and educational links to exercise Black and Mexican American doctors and lawyers aren't any more likely to play "high-status" sports such as golf or tennis than less educated people within their racial-ethnic groups, and more educated blacks may actually be less inclined to do so, suggests a new study in the June issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. Relying on nationally representative data from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey-Sample Adult...

2011-05-26 15:00:00

Statement Highlights: -- Disparities based on race and ethnic origin exist in every aspect of stroke care. -- Minority groups represent at least 28 percent of the U.S. population, and the percent is expected to nearly double by the year 2050 - increasing the need to close healthcare gaps. -- Education can significantly improve stroke care for minority groups. Programs to reach young minorities can help raise awareness that stroke is preventable and treatable. DALLAS, May 26, 2011...