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2013-06-18 23:27:21

Family Survival Course review released by Ryan Davidsonfor Jason Richard´s newly released home study survival guide. Flagstaff, AZ (PRWEB) June 17, 2013 Family Survival Course has finally been released after much anticipation and is helping thousands of people across the country learn valuable survival skills that will be vital in the case of economic collapse or natural disaster like we've seen lately with all the tornadoes. Unlike other survival programs, Jason Richards was bold...

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2012-07-16 21:06:16

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The online paywalls erected by scientific journal publishers, who maintain healthy profit margins, may soon come crashing down. The first crack in publishers´ pricey barriers came with a set of new proposals issued today by the U.K.  government. An announcement made by Universities and Science Minister David Willetts outlined the government´s plan to adopt a number of recommendations from a report earlier this...

Researchers Push For Open Access For Scientific Journals
2012-06-19 14:48:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Back in April, a frustrated U.K. mathematician let forth a litany of criticisms on his blog about the scientific journal publisher Elsevier and it sparked a movement – the Academic Spring. Cambridge University professor Tim Gowers said he and his colleagues should no longer be chained to the oppressive regime of private publishing companies who erect large paywalls and use strong-arm negotiating tactics to keep research papers, which are often publicly...

2012-05-27 23:00:24

The risk of a child born today suffering an early death due to nuclear war is at least 10%, according to a notable Stanford professor. To help Americans prepare for the worst, the U.S. Gold Bureau and Wise Food Storage Company have teamed up to offer a line of emergency survival products that include long-term foods, survival gear and gold and silver currency. Austin, TX (PRWEB) May 26, 2012 The United States Gold Bureau has partnered with Wise Food Storage Company, an official sponsor of...

2012-01-02 12:04:48

Pioneering electronic publication of new plant species The changes to the publication requirements of new names for algae, fungi and plants accepted at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne in July 2011 initiated several important challenges to scientists, publishers and information specialists. To address practical questions arising from the Congress decisions, the open access journal PhytoKeys will publish a series of seven exemplar papers, one each day for the first...

2011-06-14 12:58:15

Since the World Wide Web emerged in the mid 1990s scientists have dreamed of having the whole body of scientific peer reviewed literature freely available on the web, openly available without any hindrance. In the "Open Access" scenario each published article is just one mouse-click away from any reader worldwide, a model which is in sharp contrast to the established subscription system (whereby access is only provided to those people who are able to pay for an annual subscription), 'Open...

2010-10-19 15:51:22

New findings settle one of the arguments about Open Access (OA) research publications: Are they more likely to be cited because they were made OA, or were they made OA because they were more likely to be cited? The study, which will be published in PLoS ONE on the first day of Open Access Week (18 October), was carried out by a bi-national team of researchers from the University of Southampton's School of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) in the UK and l'Universit© du Qu©bec...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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