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Study Of Sociable Weavers Shows Everybody Needs Good

Study Of Sociable Weavers Shows Everybody Needs Good Neighbors

The University of Sheffield A new insight into one of the biggest questions in science – why some animals, including humans, work together to maintain a common good – has been achieved by scientists at the University of Sheffield....

Latest Sociobiology Stories

2014-06-04 15:23:01

Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press) This week in Molecular Biology and Evolution The social insects, including bees, wasps, ants and termites have developed a highly advanced society where division of labor amongst workers to serve the queen's reproduction has long fascinated biologists who have wanted to uncover the molecular pathways driving the complex behavior of insect societies. In the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, Claire...

How Gene Expression Differs Between Castes In Ants
2014-01-30 11:53:06

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Novel or highly modified genes play a major role in the development of the different castes within ant colonies. Evolutionary biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) came to this conclusion in a recent gene expression study. Dr. Barbara Feldmeyer and her colleagues at the JGU Institute of Zoology studied the question how the different female castes arise. An ant colony generally consists of a queen and the workers. Moreover, workers can...

Mongooses Synchronize Births To Escape Infanticide
2013-12-24 07:28:41

University of Exeter Some mammals may have evolved to synchronize births as a way of evading the threat of infanticide, according to a study led by the University of Exeter. To ensure groups remain productive, some social animals 'police' selfish reproduction by subordinate animals by killing any offspring they produce. For example, in honeybees and other social insects some workers lay their own eggs, but these are identified and killed by the rest of the workforce. The new study...

Veil Of Ignorance Is Sometimes Bliss
2013-10-24 08:22:27

Washington University in St. Louis A range of examples suggests a lack of information about their fellows can favor cooperation and prevent conflict among animals — and even among genes For the Oct. 16 issue of Biology Letters, a special issue commemorating the 50th anniversary of W.D. Hamilton’s famous paper on kin selection, two Washington University in St. Louis biologists contributed an article describing intriguing exceptions to one of his predictions. The basic idea of...

2013-10-08 09:46:13

Subordinate female meerkats who try to breed often lose their offspring to infanticide by the dominant female or are evicted from the group. These recently bereaved or ostracized mothers may then become wet-nurses for the dominant female, an activity that may be a form of "rent" that allows them to remain in the community. Wet-nursing another mother's offspring – called allolactation – occurs across a variety of mammals and is thought to provide survival benefits to the nursed...

Monogamy Evolved As A Mating Strategy
2013-07-30 05:38:41

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The evolution of monogamy among male mammals appears to have been triggered by the threat of infants being killed by unrelated males, researchers reported on Monday in the journal PNAS. The study is the first to reveal this evolutionary pathway for the emergence of pair living, and contradicts the theory monogamy resulted from a need for extra parental care by the father. The researchers also found males were more likely to...

Mammals Choose Sex Of Their Babies To Promote Life
2013-07-11 12:57:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mammals are able to "choose" the sex of their offspring in order to beat the odds and produce extra grandchildren, according to a study published in the journal PLoS ONE. Researchers analyzed 90 years of breeding records from the San Diego Zoo, helping to prove for the first time what has been a fundamental theory of evolutionary biology. Scientists have theorized before that mammals rely on some unknown physiologic mechanism to...

2013-04-30 23:21:18

A team of researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is proposing a new investigative roadmap for the field of evolutionary developmental biology, or “evo devo,” to better understand how innovation at the genetic level can lead to ecological adaptations over time. Evo devo seeks to understand the specific genetic mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. Seven UMass Amherst authors, all biologists but with diverse research programs including evolutionary genetics,...

2013-04-12 16:01:57

Large helpers (nannies) in a cichlid fish allow the dominant male and female to reduce their personal contribution to their offspring and territory, according to new research published today in Functional Ecology. By removing the large helper for 30 days — which corresponds to one breeding cycle in this species — a team from the University of Bristol and the University of Bern (Switzerland) studied the investment strategies of the dominant pair and the survival of their brood,...

2013-02-26 10:42:38

New research delivers a sting in the tail for queen wasps. Scientists have sequenced the active parts of the genome — or transcriptome — of primitively eusocial wasps to identify the part of the genome that makes you a queen or a worker. Their work, published in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Biology, shows that workers have a more active transcriptome than queens. This suggests that in these simple societies, workers may be the 'jack-of-all-trades' in the colony -...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.