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Latest SOD1 Stories

2013-03-14 16:27:35

WASHINGTON, March 14, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In research supported by The ALS Association and published in the online journal Neuron, scientists in London have shown that mutation in a gene that causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) reduces the energy supply in neurons and other cells--suggesting that the inability to produce sufficient quantities of energy is an important step in causing some cases of ALS. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, is a progressive...

2013-03-12 12:27:58

Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D. and Bryan Traynor, M.D., Ph.D. Receive Essey Award WASHINGTON, March 12, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On Tuesday, March 19, The ALS Association and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) will present the 2013 Sheila Essey Award for ALS Research at AAN's annual meeting in San Diego, California to Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D. and Bryan Traynor, M.D. Ph.D. These two scientists independently identified a mutation in the C9orf72 gene, on Chromosome 9, that causes ALS, a...

2012-08-27 13:01:20

ALS discovery points to new pathways and potential treatment strategy A team of scientists, including faculty at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), have discovered a gene that influences survival time in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). The study, published today in Nature Medicine, describes how the loss of activity of a receptor called EphA4 substantially extends the lifespan of people with the disease. When coupled with a UMMS...

2011-12-19 08:00:00

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 19, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) today announced a research agreement with Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) and UCB Pharma SA (EN Brussels: UCB) to investigate the use of an anti-CD40L antibody as a potential therapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's or Motor Neuron Disease. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110204/DC42625LOGO)...

2011-08-12 12:17:12

Sigma-1 receptor offers potential therapeutic target Researchers from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have identified a mutation on the SIGMAR1 gene associated with the development of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Study findings published today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and the Child Neurology Society, show the gene variant affects Sigma-1 receptors which are involved in motor neuron function and disease development. ALS, also...

2011-08-11 13:42:28

For decades, scientists have studied a laboratory mouse model that develops signs of the paralyzing disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as they age. In a new study appearing in Nature Biotechnology, investigators at Nationwide Children's Hospital have developed a new model of ALS, one that mimics sporadic ALS, which represents about 90 percent of all cases. ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is characterized by the death of motor neurons, which are muscle-controlling nerve...

2011-03-22 07:00:00

ADDF, MDA, AFTD and ALS TDI Jointly Fund Characterization of TDP-43 Mouse CAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 22, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) announced today that it has entered into collaboration with the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), the Alzheimer's Drug Development Foundation (ADDF) and The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) to fund the characterization of a new model of neurodegeneration called the TDP-43 mouse. (Logo:...

2010-11-22 19:45:57

A team of Brandeis scientists makes breakthrough with mutant gene that causes familial form of Lou Gehrig's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that eventually destroys most motor neurons, causing muscle weakness and atrophy throughout the body. There is no cure and the current treatment has only a moderate effect on the march of the disease, which typically kills within three to five years. This week in PNAS, a team of Brandeis scientists reports...

2010-10-20 19:25:22

For the first time, researchers have discovered a disease mechanism that links hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to the more common "sporadic" form of ALS -- and points to a possible therapeutic target. The findings are reported online in advance of publication in the journal Nature Neuroscience. ALS is an adult-onset disease that causes progressive degeneration of motor neurons and death within three to five years of diagnosis. Scott Brady, professor and head of anatomy and cell...

2010-08-26 12:32:09

New research uncovers what may be a primary neuron-damaging insult that occurs in an inherited form of a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. The study, published by Cell Press in the August 26th issue of the journal Neuron, describes a critical mechanistic link between a mutant protein and disease pathogenesis in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a disease that attacks the neurons in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement. There is no cure...